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Faculty Grants

CREATE Awardees

Five proposals from faculty teams were selected for funding in the 2022-2023 academic year. These dynamic programs will impact student success and will help the CSU reach its Graduation Initiative 2025 goals.

 

Decreasing Equity Gaps in Degree Completion by Empowering CSU Students, Faculty, and Staff through Action Projects informed by Intergroup Dialogue

Our program will decrease graduation gaps by taking a holistic approach that centers social justice and requires inclusion of university stakeholders including students, staff, and faculty. We will tackle equity gaps through a two-semester online program including (1) training in intergroup dialogue (IGD) (Gurin, Nagda, & Zuniga, 2013; Zúñiga et al., 2014; Kelly, et al., 2022), which is grounded in contact theory (Alport, 1954) and social justice education, and (2) action implementation to move the needle toward higher degree completion at the 10 Southern California CSU campuses. IGD can equip students, faculty, and staff with skills to not only critically recognize barriers that result in achievement gaps, but empower collective action to address these gaps. Participants trained in IGD will affect many other constituents at their campuses by carrying out action projects to tackle the Graduation Initiative 2025.

 

Manpreet Dhillon-Brar headshotDr. Manpreet Dhillon Brar | Principal Investigator
Assistant Professor
Department of Child Development
California State University, San Bernardino

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Manpreet Dhillon Brar (pronouns: she/her) is a trained facilitator of intergroup dialogue and passionate educator. She has a doctorate from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in Education with an emphasis in Human Development and Psychology (2020). She has published and presented her work on civic engagement, dialogue, societal “isms” and intergroup relations. Having completed training for intergroup dialogue facilitation at the University of Michigan (2013) and at UCLA (2015), Dr. Dhillon Brar has facilitated workshops, classes, and training on diversity, equity, inclusion, and intergroup issues at multiple colleges, schools, community and private institutions. Dr. Dhillon Brar’s intergroup dialogue work includes addressing global and international audiences as well such as through educational study abroad trips with undergraduate students to conflict-ridden regions in the Middle East (2017-2019) and fellowship with the United Nations Development Programme in India (2017). Dr. Dhillon Brar is currently an Assistant Professor of Child Development at California State University, San Bernardino, where she serves majority first generation college students in hopes of reducing equity gaps and advancing inclusion through mentorship, teaching, and advocacy. As a diversity thought leader with a decade of experience, Dr. Dhillon Brar continues to serve as an equity and inclusion consultant for various projects and entities such as the City of Los Angeles and UC Adolescent Consortium. 

 

Dr. Stacy Morris | Co-Principal Investigator​Stacy Morris headshot
Assistant Professor
Department of Child Development
California State University, San Bernardino

 

 

 

 

Stacy Morris, Ph.D. (pronouns: she/her) is an Assistant Professor of Child Development at California State University, San Bernardino. She has a doctorate from Boston College in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Arizona State University in the T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics. She has received training in intergroup dialogue through the Universal Human Rights Initiative (2022) and has done work in university settings on examining and addressing inequities. Dr. Morris’ research and community involvement centers on supporting community engagement in adolescents and young adults and working toward dismantling inequities through building understanding of systems of inequity and motivating collective action. She has taught, published, and presented on issues related to equity, first-generation college students, and fostering an understanding of critical societal issues.