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From left, Zachary Powell (criminal justice), Marc Robinson (history) and Rafik Mohamed (dean, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences) on the set at NBC Palm Springs. Photo by NBC Palm Springs
February 9, 2021

As part of our celebration of Black History Month, take a look back when Zachary Powell (criminal justice), Marc Robinson (history) and Rafik Mohamed (dean, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences) were interviewed for the three-part series on the history of policing Black communities. 

“Over-Policing of Black Girls in Schools: From Zero Tolerance to Restorative Practices,” will take place on Zoom beginning at 4 p.m. Wednesday.
October 12, 2020

“Over-Policing of Black Girls in Schools: From Zero Tolerance to Restorative Practices,” will take place on Zoom beginning at 4 p.m.

“Police Unions in the U.S.: Perspectives in Historical Context” will be the 19th presentation in the series that began in June.  Photo: WikiMedia Commons
October 5, 2020

“Police Unions in the U.S.: Perspectives in Historical Context” will take place virtually at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 7.

Racism as a public health crisis will be discussed at the next Conversations on Race and Policing at 4 p.m. on Wednesday.
September 25, 2020

“Declaring Racism a Public Health Crisis: What It Means and Where Do We Go from Here,” a panel presentation, will take place virtually at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 30.

The panel discussion, “White Supremacists and Militia Extremists in Police Departments,” with (from left) Vida Johnson, Michael German and Sam Levin, will take place on Zoom at 4 p.m. Wednesday.
September 21, 2020

The panel on Sept. 23 will feature Vida Johnson, associate professor of law at Georgetown University; Michael German, former FBI special agent and now a fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice’s Liberty & National Security Program; and Sam Levin, Los Angeles correspondent for The Guardian.

From left, Odilia Romero, Stan Rodriguez and Daisy Ocampo.
September 13, 2020

The panel of activists and community-based scholars will discuss issues ranging from the Los Angeles Police Department, access to translators for indigenous people, the way race shapes the American justice system, the policing of indigenous people across the border and other topics.

"Where Is Hope: The Art of Murder," grafic
September 8, 2020

"Where Is Hope: The Art of Murder," directed by Emmitt H. Thrower, a retired New York police officer, chronicles disabled victims killed by police as well as the activists/artists who are fighting to end police brutality against people with disabilities.

Daniel Gascón, a CSUSB alumnus, is the co-author of “The Limits of Community Policing: Civilian Power and Police Accountability in Black and Brown Los Angeles."
August 31, 2020

Daniel Gascón, a CSUSB alumnus who is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, will present “The Limits of Community Policing,” 4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 2, on Zoom.  

Faculty in the News
August 28, 2020

Mike Stull (entrepreneurship) discussed CSUSB’s news School of Entrepreneurship, Brian Levin (criminal justice) was interviewed about people bringing weapons to otherwise peaceful protests, and Kevin Grisham (geography and environmental studies) gave insight on the QAnon conspiracy movement.