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Anti-Racism Resources for #ScholarStrike

Anti-Racism Resources for #ScholarStrike

Posted by: Tiffany Jones
September 06, 2020
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#ScholarStrike and Teach-In for Racial Justice Resources

Tuesday, September 8th and Wednesday, September 9th, 2020

#ScholarStrike, originally organized by Anthea Butler and Kevin Gannon, begins on Tuesday, Sept 8 and will continue into Wednesday, Sept 9, 2020.  According to Inside Higher Ed, over 5,000 scholars are planning to strike or participate in a teach-in or both.  Some scholars will refrain from their usual duties and instead participate in actions against systemic racism.  Below are some resources collected by various entities on our campus and available for faculty and students who would like to participate in this event.

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Race and Policing Series: Police Brutality against People with Disabilities

Events:

Conversations on Race and Policing Series - Wednesday, Sept 9 at 4:30 p.m. via Zoom. A screening and panel discussion of the film, "Where Is Hope: The Art of Murder," which chronicles disabled victims murdered by police as well as the activists/artists who are fighting to end police brutality against people with disabilities. The work of many disabled activists and artists/activists are explored around this issue, especially involving disabled people of color. Notably, Director Emmitt H. Thrower is a retired NYC cop turned artist/filmmaker. Zoom link: https://csusb.zoom.us/j/97960458784 

Panelists: 

Emmitt H. Thrower--an award-winning Bronx filmmaker, director and producer--is the founder of the not-for-profit company, Wabi Sabi Productions Inc.  
 
Leroy Moore, Jr., is a writer, poet, activist, and founder of Krip-Hop Nation 
 
 
Dr. Beth Ribet, PhD, JD, is a nationally recognized disabilities scholar. She is Visiting Research Professor at Seton Hall University and the Director and Co-Founder of Repair
 
The program is part of the ongoing Conversations on Race and Policing series, hosted by CSUSB students Marlo Brooks and Yvette Relles-Powell.    

 

Series organizers: Dr. Mary Texeira (Sociology), Dr. Marc Robinson (History), Robie Madrigal (Pfau Library), Dr. Jeremy Murray (History), Marlo Brooks, and Yvette Relles-Powell.   

The first ten recordings of the ongoing Conversations on Race and Policing series are available on YouTube, linked below.  More recordings will soon be available for viewing.

Conversations on Race and Policing (1), CSUSB Panel Presentation and Discussion

Conversations on Race and Policing (2), CSUSB Panel Presentation and Discussion

Conversations on Race and Policing (3), CSUSB Panel Presentation and Discussion

Conversations on Race and Policing (4), CSUSB Panel Presentation and Discussion

Conversations on Race and Policing (5), CSUSB Panel Presentation and Discussion

Conversations on Race and Policing (6), CSUSB Panel Presentation and Discussion

Conversations on Race and Policing (7), CSUSB Panel Presentation and Discussion

Conversations on Race and Policing (8), CSUSB Panel Presentation and Discussion

Conversations on Race and Policing (9), CSUSB Panel Presentation and Discussion

Conversations on Race and Policing (10), CSUSB Panel Presentation and Discussion

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Resources:

Documentaries available for showing (thank you to Barbara Quarton, Coordinator Library Media Services, for compiling the original list):

13th 

Combining archival footage with testimony from activists and scholars, director Ava DuVernay's examination of the U.S. prison system looks at how the country's history of racial inequality drives the high rate of incarceration in America.  Available on youtube for free for a limited time.

 

Detroit 48202

Detroit 48202: Conversations Along a Postal Route is urgent. It asks: will the resurgence of Detroit center on a high tech, and increasingly white downtown or, will it focus on the vast stretches of neglected neighborhoods that continue to deal with a 40% poverty rate, water shutoffs, tax foreclosures, poor transportation, and a school system in crisis?

 

Finally Got the News

Beginning with a historical montage, from the early days of slavery through the subsequent growth and organization of the working class, this film focuses on the crucial role played by the black worker in the American economy.

 

I Am Not Your Negro

An Oscar-nominated documentary narrated by Samuel L. Jackson, this film explores the continued peril America faces from institutionalized racism through the words of James Baldwin.

 

Power to Heal

Power to Heal tells a poignant chapter in the historic struggle to secure equal and adequate access to healthcare for all Americans. Central to the story is the tale of how a new national program, Medicare, was used to mount a dramatic, coordinated effort that desegregated thousands of hospitals across the country practically overnight.

 

Race: The Power of an Illusion (episodes 1-3) through Kanopy

A three hour series that examines the concept of race in society, its origins, how it affects people's lives and how it is used to rationalize, social inequalities. A companion website also now exists at https://www.racepowerofanillusion.org.

 

South

"How does the southern silence become so heavy and so menacing so suddenly? How do the trees and the whole natural environment evoke so intensely death, blood, and the weight of history? How does the present call up the past? And how does this past, with a mere gesture or a simple regard, haunt and torment you as you wander along an empty cotton field, or a dusty country road?"

 

The Intolerable Burden

The Intolerable Burden examines the conditions of segregation prior to 1965, the hardships the family faced during desegregation, and the massive white resistance, which led to re-segregation.

 

Through a Lens Darkly

Bringing to light the hidden and unknown photos shot by both professional and vernacular African American photographers, the film opens a window into lives, experiences and perspectives of black families that is absent from the traditional historical canon. These images show a much more complex and nuanced view of American culture and society and its founding ideals.

 

Tim Wise: On White Privilege

This is an ideal introduction to the social construction of racial identities, and a critical new tool for exploring the often invoked--but seldom explained--concept of white privilege.

 

White Like Me: Race, Racism & White Privilege in America

Based on the work of acclaimed anti-racist educator and author Tim Wise, explores race and racism in the US through the lens of whiteness and white privilege. 

 

Books/Articles: 

Note: Some items on this list were generated from Anti-Racism Resources for White People, a Google document compiled by Sarah Sophie Flicker and Alyssa Klein in May 2020.

 

Podcasts: 

 

Google document with link to information/resources about #ScholarsStrike compiled by Dr. Thomas (T.C.) Corrigan, CSUSB Communication Studies. 

 

Further resources can be found on the Scholar Strike for Racial Justice website.

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