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Written Communication GLO

Written Communication GLO Rubric

Download a .pdf copy of the rubric.

  Advanced (3) Developing (2) Emerging (1) Initial (0)
1.Establishes a clear,
credible, and
creditable purpose
that responds
appropriately to the
context for the writing
project.
Establishes a credible and creditable purpose that demonstrates thorough consideration of the context of the writing project, including the expectations associated with the discourse community and the particular audience written for, and clearly uses those insights to further the rhetorical project to increase the likelihood of the work’s successful reception. Establishes a credible purpose that demonstrates adequate consideration of the context of the writing project, including the expectations associated with the discourse community and the particular audience written for, along with a clear focus on the assigned task.  Establishes a somewhat credible purpose that demonstrates awareness of the context of the writing project, including instructor expectations and assignment parameters.  Shows beginning attention to the audience’s perceptions and assumptions. Establishes a purpose that minimally responds to the context of the writing project, including instructor expectations and assignment parameters.
2.Develops content
using appropriate
genre conventions.
Selects a genre appropriate to the context and purpose for writing and utilizes the kinds and levels of evidence, analysis, logic, argumentation appropriate for that context and purpose in order to develop and explore ideas throughout the whole work.  On the whole, the text avoids feeling formulaic; the writer shows sophisticated treatment of content and related features of writing. Selects a genre appropriate to the context and purpose for writing and utilizes the kinds and levels of evidence, analysis, logic, argumentation appropriate for that context and purpose in order to develop and explore ideas throughout the whole work. Selects a genre or organizational structure and utilizes the kinds and levels of evidence, analysis, logic, argumentation appropriate for the context and purpose to develop and explore ideas through most of the work. Attempts to use a consistent system or familiar format for basic organization and uses it to develop simple ideas in some parts of the work.
3.Makes use of others
ideas and texts
appropriately to
further one’s own
project.
Uses and speaks back to other writers and scholars to constitute new knowledge, insights, arguments, analyses, theories, etc.  The writer is recognizable as a contributor within an intellectual conversation and community. Uses sources well to provide evidence and data.  Recognizes that intellectual writers typically write to respond and intervene in ongoing inquiries, arguments, or conversations and represents enough of that conversation to provide contextual backdrop to the work at hand. Uses credible and relevant sources and citation practices to help realize the purpose of the writing project. Sources are used appropriately to provide evidence or data, although the writer may not yet treat sources as “co-thinkers” or recognize that the project is potentially situated in a larger conversation. Attempts to use and cite sources, typically to borrow an expert’s voice to express or to validate ideas. Quoting is often preferred over paraphrasing and summarizing, even when those treatments might better establish authority and evenness of tone.
4.Makes appropriate
language and syntax
choices.
Makes intentional choices about the expected conventions regarding tone, level of diction, and adherence to standard language practices to establish credibility and further the writer’s purpose.  Deviations from expected practices, should they appear, are pursued thoughtfully and for rhetorical purposes. Uses language in ways that conveys meaning and establishes credibility within the public, professional or disciplinary community that constitutes the context of the writing project. Uses language in ways that generally conveys meaning and establishes credibility within the public, professional, or disciplinary community that constitutes the context of the writing project, although there may be occasional unevenness in tone, diction, syntax, or word choice. Language use and syntax practices (tone, level of diction, adherence to standard language practices) are largely inconsistent with those typical within the context of participation in ways that obscure meaning and undermine the author’s credibility.
5.Utilizes effective
writing processes
Utilizes flexible and responsive writing processes that enable the writer to work through textual and intellectual puzzles and to make rich use of feedback to help guide writerly decision-making. Engages in the stages of the writing process recursively, as determined by the writer’s needs and purposes, rather than linearly or formulaically. Assesses feedback and uses it selectively to assist in development, revision, and editing.  Engages in invention, idea development, revision, and editing processes, including the use of instructor and peer feedback, to develop their work. Attempts to use instructor and peer feedback to aid in text development.

 

What does this GLO mean?

The primary goal of this GLO is to produce graduates who can participate thoughtfully and powerfully in textual conversations for civic, intellectual, disciplinary, professional, or other social purposes. CSUSB graduates should have the metacognitive ability to assess the needs and demands of new occasions for writing and to determine how to effectively address them with agency, fluency, and confidence.

What should courses that seek Certification as a GE Course that satisfies this GLO include?

In order to write credibly and well, writers must understand that writing, like all language use, is shaped by its contexts and purposes; they must be able to ascertain the possibilities and limitations of the occasions for writing in order to make informed choices about how they will participate in the textual conversations they are entering. The six concepts described below, with which students should be familiar from their first-year composition courses, support a writer’s ability to do this. Courses applying for certification should explicitly reinforce these concepts in order to help students write successfully for the contexts and purposes relevant to the course.

1. Context

The context of writing shapes it; it helps determine what can and cannot be said (or what may or may not be heard or valued).  Context includes elements such as the need for the writing, the kinds of problems the writing is to address, the audience or discourse community written for or within, the historical moment of participation, and the potential of available media for text production or publication

2. Discourse community

A discourse community is a group of people who share values, assumptions, genres, and ways of thinking, practicing and speaking. Writers establish their authority and credibility within discourse communities through their language, discourse, and genre practices.

3. Genre

Genres are recognizable but flexible forms of writing whose features may be purposefully mixed to accomplish a writer’s purposes within particular contexts. (For instance, a grant proposal may include features of a literature review, analysis, argumentation, and so forth.) Genre conventions are formal and informal rules for particular kinds of texts and/or media that guide formatting, organization, and stylistic choices. The genres typical of a community or discipline embed and reflect the ways of seeing, thinking, knowing, valuing, and expressing that are particular to that community.

4. Writing as participation in textual conversation

Intellectual writers typically write in order to respond to and intervene in ongoing inquiries, arguments, or conversations. Entering academic or intellectual conversations in textual form involves inquiring, analyzing, investigating, thinking, and speaking, in part, with and through other people’s language and texts.

5. Writing as a recursive process:

Writing involves a rhetorical process that typically includes inventing, drafting, revising, editing, and sometimes researching. These processes do not necessarily occur in a neat, linear fashion, but recur as writers use the act of writing to work out their ideas.

What should CSUSB graduates be able to do?

An understanding of the concepts described above will support students’ ability to do the following:

Establish a clear purpose that responds appropriately to the context for the writing project.

  • Analyze the social context, giving rise to this occasion for writing, including the expectations of audience or discourse community.
  • Establish a credible and creditable purpose that responds to the context for writing.

Develop content using appropriate genre conventions.

  • Analyze the discourse practices of the public, professional, or disciplinary community or venue of participation.
  • Select an appropriate genre for the context and purpose of the writing project.
  • Use the genre features and conventions intentionally and flexibly to achieve that purpose.
  • Meet the expectations of the audience/community including the kinds and levels of evidence, analysis, logic, argumentation, and so on, required for credible participation within the genre.

Make use of others’ ideas and texts appropriately to further one’s own project.

  • Select credible and/or relevant sources and make appropriate use of the work of other writers and thinkers to accomplish the purposes for writing, whether that involves summoning a conversation or intervening in it.
  • Make intentional choices about adherence to expected conventions, including citation and bibliographic conventions.

Make appropriate language and syntax choices.

  • Evaluate the discourse practices of the public, professional, or disciplinary community or venue of participation to ascertain how to establish credibility.
  • Make intentional choices about expected conventions regarding tone, level of diction, and adherence to standard language practices within the context to further the writer’s purpose.

Develop effective writing processes.

  • Recognize that writing involves various inventing, developing, revising, and editing processes and that writers must find their own best strategies for each of these through practice.
  • Appreciate that these processes are not linear and may occur in various combinations and at any time in relation the writer’s needs and interests.
  • Develop a flexible and responsive writing process and resilience in working through textual and intellectual puzzles.

What should courses with the Writing Intensive Designation include?

Courses with the Writing Intensive Designation, whether at the lower- or upper-division level, should provide instruction in writing by giving attention to these ideas (language, context, genre, discourse community, writing as inquiry and writing as recursive process) in relation to meaningful writing projects and should further support student writers by offering feedback on drafts, opportunities for revision and editing, and opportunities for metacognitive reflection on their development as writers.

To meet the definition of Writing Intensive, a course must satisfy the following structural requirements:

  • Writing is comprehensively integrated into the course and tied to course objectives and learning outcomes.
  • Writing comprises a significant part of the course work and reflects genres and writing activities appropriate to the course and/or discipline.
  • Writing is explained and supported in the course: students are engaged in explicit discussions of the relevance of writing to the course and/or discipline, provided guidance in meeting genre and style expectations, and offered opportunities to assert their agency within those terms.
  • Writing assignments are scaffolded. Writing and thinking activities are designed to support one another and to feed one another throughout the course.
  • Writing is supported by feedback and opportunities for revision. Instructors provide meaningful feedback on writing assignments and incorporate systematic opportunities for writers to work with that feedback.

Resources:

  • TRC-sponsored professional development opportunities to support faculty in teaching writing.

  • University Writing Center

  • English department online resource guide for faculty teaching first year writing.

  • Archive of sample assignments and explanations of how they are supported. (Would need to create)

  • Purdue OWL -- a well-established online writing lab that provides resources, including guidance in most citation systems.

  • Bean, John. Engaging Ideas: The Professor’s Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom. Wiley & Sons, 2011. (Jossey-Bass imprint) ISBN: 1118062337, 9781118062333. Copies available at the TRC.

Materials from Writing Instensive Institute

(on OrgSync, CSUSB login required)