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Metacognition Rubric

Learning How to Learn / Metacognition Rubric

Download a .pdf version of the Metacognition Rubric.

What does this GLO mean?

The GLO for Metacognition: An awareness and an understanding of one’s own thought processes.

Metacognition requires students to analyze their own thoughts (to put it simply, it is “thinking about thinking”). This will allow them to question their thinking and may potentially challenge what was previously believed to be true. This also allows students the opportunity to see how their understanding has changed over time.

Student reflections, such as this following (aacu.org/sites/default/files/ReflectionHandoutStudent.pdf) are opportunities for students to engage in metacognition and, most importantly, can be directly assessed. Additional information about high impact practices that address this GLO can be found here: http://www.aacu.org/leap/hips

The key to meeting this GLO is to include assignments that challenge students to explore their thought processes and show an understanding of the changes in their ways of thinking.

What should courses that seek fulfillment of this GLO include?

Courses that seek certification as a GE course that satisfies this GLO would provide opportunities for students to explore their prior knowledge and reflect on how this has changed due to their experiences in the course. These assignments would need to be directly assessed.

Students can articulate how their own thought processes and learning styles are unique.

Students show how their own learning process directly impacts their understanding and expression of information.

Metacognition Rubric
 

ADVANCED (3)

DEVELOPING (2)

EMERGING (1)

INITIAL (0)

1. Reflection and Self-assessment (Providing opportunities for individuals to question prior experiences and assess previously learned knowledge)

Students demonstrate a strong sense of self as learner by challenging their previous perceptions in new contexts. Students articulate these changes in thinking clearly and confidently.

Students articulate how new information and concepts have directly changed their previous ideas about a topic.

Students demonstrate that learning new information changes their previous understandings and preconceptions.

Students do not show any understanding of changes in their thinking.

2. Transfer (Providing opportunities to take prior learning strategies and apply them to different situations)

Students articulate how they applied information from other courses to a new situation in this course. Students can demonstrate the impact of prior knowledge in the synthesis of new knowledge.

Students can articulate how they used a prior learning strategy in a new situation.

Students demonstrate that prior learning influences their current learning experiences.

Students do not recognize the impact of prior learning on new contexts.

3. Self-awareness (Providing opportunities to analyze and express the individual process of learning)

Students clearly articulate their individual thought processes in several ways, and express why certain learned information is meaningful to them.in different contexts.

Students can articulate how their own thought processes and learning styles are unique.

Students can articulate how their own thought processes and learning styles are unique.

Students do not explore their individual thought processes, nor express why certain learned information is meaningful to them.