Course Offerings

PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)

Lower Division

101. Moral Choices in Life
Fundamentals of ethical reasoning. Introduction to moral theories and methods of moral decision making. Focus on such issues as ethics in the workplace, responsible citizenship, euthanasia, and responsibilities to the homeless, the environment and animals. (GE=E2) (2 units)
105. Critical Thinking Through Argument Analysis
Analysis of various kinds of reasoning employed in everyday life and in more specialized contexts, to develop each student's skill in understanding and using carefully constructed arguments. Illustrations will include materials drawn from contemporary issues. (GE=A4) (4 units)
190. Introduction to Philosophical Issues
An introduction to philosophical thinking by means of reading, discussing and writing about selected philosophical works. Students are encouraged to develop their own philosophical views in a critical exchange with the views of the philosophers studied. Prerequisite: satisfaction of the GE written communication (A1) requirement or equivalent. (GE=C4) (4 units)
191. Introduction to Ethics
An introduction to ethics and moral theory. Philosophical approaches to questions of right and wrong, duty and obligation, good and evil. Deals with both individual morality and social morality. Prerequisite: satisfaction of the GE written communication (A1) requirement or equivalent. (GE=C4) (4 units)
192. Introduction to Philosophy of Religion
Introductory treatment of philosophical issues raised by religion and religious belief; discussion of issues such as relations between faith, belief and knowledge, arguments for the existence of god, the problem of evil, and immortality. Prerequisite: satisfaction of the GE written communication (A1) requirement or equivalent. (GE=C4) (4 units)
193. Introduction to Eastern Philosophy
Introduction to the ways in which Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism and Confucianism view human life and reality. Prerequisite: satisfaction of the GE written communication (A1) requirement or equivalent. (GE=C4) (4 units)
194. Introduction to Knowledge and Reality
Inquiry into philosophical presuppositions underlying common sense and scientific views of knowledge and reality. Possible topics include: Was the universe created? Is the world as it appears to us? Are humans merely complex machines or do they have souls? How do we know what we know? Prerequisite: satisfaction of the GE written communication (A1) requirement or equivalent. (GE=C4) (4 units)
200. Critical Thinking Through Symbolic Logic
Introduction to logic and its application to everyday reasoning. Emphasis on formal methods and modern symbolic logic. Formerly PHIL 205. (GE=A4) (4 units)
206. Critical and Analytic Reasoning
Review of logical notions and combinatorial methods introduced in many critical reasoning courses (e.g. PHIL 200); extension of those notions and methods to increasingly complex problems, including problems of the sort encountered in analytic portions of the GRE and LSAT exams. Formerly PHIL 305. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the General Education Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)

Upper Division

300. Predicate Logic
Introduction to the standard predicate calculus. Some metatheory. This course requires some basic mathematical or logical background. Prerequisite: PHIL 200 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
306. Inductive Logic
Principles of reasoning underlying the scientific method. Topics include hypothesis formation and testing, foundations and philosophical interpretation of probability and decision theory. Formerly a topic under PHIL 400. Prerequisites: PHIL 200 and satisfaction of the GE Philosophy (C4) requirement. (4 units)
308. Alternative Logics
Formal systems possibly including modal logics, conditional logics, many-valued logics and relevant logics alternative to classical symbolic logic. Formerly a topic under PHIL 400. Prerequisite: PHIL 200 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
310. Introduction to Philosophical Methodology
Intensive introduction to philosophical methods: identification and analysis of philosophical arguments, analytical reading of philosophical texts, and techniques for constructing and evaluating philosophical theories and arguments. May be repeated for credit, four units may count toward the major and eight units may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
311. Ancient Philosophy
Introduction to the origin of Western philosophy, as represented in the works of the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, Epicureans, Skeptics and Mystics. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
312. Medieval Philosophy
Study of philosophical thought from the Neoplatonists up to Descartes. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
313. History of Modern Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality
Major philosophical developments in Western philosophy from Descartes through Kant, focusing on the nature of knowledge and reality. Formerly PHIL 318. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
314. History of Modern Philosophy: Ethics and Politics
Major philosophical developments in Western philosophy from Machiavelli to Mill, focusing on ethics and political theory. Formerly PHIL 319. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
315. History of Modern Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality II
Major philosophical developments in the Modern period of Western philosophy, focusing on the nature of knowledge and reality. A continuation of PHIL 313 featuring figures such as Locke, Leibniz and Berkeley. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
320. Philosophy of Education
Inquiry into the nature of education and its role in human life, and the role of individual and social values. Readings from classical and contemporary philosophers. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
350. Ethics
The nature of the meaningful life and its relation to concepts of right and wrong explored through various moral theories. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
351. Topics in Moral and Political Philosophy
Consideration of select problems in moral and political theory. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
353. Topics in Applied Ethics
Study of different issues in applied ethics and political theory such as environmental ethics, business ethics, global ethics, international justice, international human rights, ethics in the helping professions, and philosophical economics. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
355. Contemporary Ethical Issues
An examination of contemporary moral issues such as abortion rights, capital punishment, animal treatment, environmental protection, business ethics, and military intervention. Specific topics will be determined by cases that universities nationwide are examining during the year the course is offered. Students who take this course will become eligible to represent CSUSB in state and national academic competitions. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
359. Philosophy and Economics
Study of issues at the intersection of economics and moral and political philosophy, e.g., classic accounts of the nature of value, the nature of justice, the nature of rationality, the measurability of human well-being. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
361. Social and Political Philosophy
An examination of major perspectives on how societies should be organized. Study of central issues such as legitimacy of government, and rights versus obligations; or of major concepts such as justice, equality, rights, class, patriarchy and power. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements.
  1. Classical political theories. (4 units)
  2. Themes in social and political philosophy. (4 units)
362. Philosophy of Law
A study of philosophical problems raised by the law, such as the nature and validity of the law, and concepts of justice; the relation between law and morality; and how rights are or ought to be reflected in the law. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements.
  1. The Concept of Law (4 units)
  2. Morality and the Law (4 units)
  3. Rights and the Law (4 units)
364. Philosophy of Race and Ethnicity
Study of theories of equality and justice as they apply to justice, affirmative action, multiculturalism, group differences and the intersections of race with gender and class. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (GE=G2) (4 units)
367. Gender and Philosophy
Philosophical theories of male and female nature, their implications concerning equality and rights, the nature of the family, and social roles of men and women. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (GE=G2) (4 units)
372. Philosophy of Religion
Problems concerned with the existence and attributes of God or gods, the significance of religious experience and its varieties, and the rationality of faith. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
375. Non-Western Philosophy
Study of various philosophical issues that arise within non-Western world views such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, and Islam. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
380. Metaphysics
Problems relating to existence. Includes issues such as realism and anti-realism, the nature of modal truth, free-will and determinism, the mind-body problem, and the nature of identity. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
382. Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics
Philosophical issues raised by logic and mathematics, such as the nature of logical and mathematical truth, the relations between logic, mathematics and the world, and justification for logical and mathematical systems. Formerly a topic under PHIL 485. Prerequisites: MATH 110 or equivalent, PHIL 200, and satisfaction of the Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
384. Philosophy of Mind
Various theories about the nature of the mind and the relation of the mind to the body and behavior. Focus will be on different approaches to psychology (behaviorism, functionalism, etc.) or on the consequences of theories of the mind for the question of whether computers can think. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements.
  1. Philosophical Psychology (4 units)
  2. Minds and Machines (4 units)
385. Theory of Knowledge
Problems concerning acquiring and justifying knowledge, including the roles of sense perception and reason, the distinction between knowledge and belief, the nature of evidence, and the concepts of truth and certainty. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
386. Philosophy of Science
Foundations of science, including the nature of scientific methodology, explanation, concept formation, and the structure of theories, using case studies from the natural sciences and social sciences. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
387. Philosophy of Language
Inquiry into the syntactic, semantic and pragmatic dimensions of language, focusing on different theories of these components, and the philosophical implications of these theories. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
390. Topics in Philosophy
Study of a specially-selected figure, movement, problem, or theory in philosophy. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
400. Advanced Issues in Logic
Discussion of issues such as axiomatic logic, proofs of soundness and completeness, multi-valued logics, modal logics and/or other alternative logics. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisite: PHIL 300 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
410. Advanced Issues in History of Philosophy
An intensive study of one or more philosophical figures. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: at least two 300-level philosophy courses and satisfaction of the GE upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
460. Advanced Issues in Value Theory
Intensive study of topics in ethics, social philosophy and/or political philosophy. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: at least two 300-level philosophy courses and satisfaction of the GE upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
472. Advanced Issues in Philosophy of Religion
Intensive study of topics in philosophy of religion. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: at least two 300-level philosophy courses and satisfaction of the GE upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
485. Advanced Issues in Metaphysics and Knowledge
Intensive study of topics in metaphysics, philosophy of language, theory of knowledge and/or philosophy of science. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: at least two 300-level philosophy courses and satisfaction of the GE upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
490. Philosophical Topics
Study of a specially selected figure, movement, problem or theory in philosophy. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE Critical Thinking (A4) and Philosophy (C4) requirements. (4 units)
516. Senior Project
Preparation and submission of a portfolio of writing representing successful work in the philosophy major, accompanied by a reflective essay showing the extent to which the student has satisfied the objectives and goals of the major. Prerequisite: completion of 135 units, including 36 units of the philosophy major. Graded credit/no credit. (1 unit)
575. Internship in Philosophy
Supervised intensive work of an applied nature that requires advanced skills in philosophy. A total of eight units may be applied toward graduation; a total of four units may be applied to the major. Generally assumes thirty hours of work/study per unit of credit. Graded credit/no credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (2-5 units)
595. Independent Study
Intensive study of topics not offered in other existing philosophy courses. No more than four units of PHIL 595 can apply towards the philosophy major without departmental approval. Prerequisites: a minimum grade point average of 3.0, consent of instructor and departmental approval of a project submitted on a standard application filed no later than the end of the first week of classes. (2-4 units)

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