Course Offerings

KINESIOLOGY (KINE)

Lower Division

The following activities include instruction at all skill levels unless specified in the Class Schedule as limited to beginning, intermediate or advanced level instruction.

101. Individual and Dual Activities
Development of basic skills, techniques, rules and strategies through instruction and practice in a variety of individual and dual type sports and activities. Graded ABC/no credit. (GE=E3)
  • A. Archery (2 units)
  • B. Badminton (2 units)
  • C. Bicycling (Field trips required.) (2 units)
  • D. Bowling (Field trips required.) (2 units)
  • F. Golf (Field trips required.) (2 units)
  • G. Gymnastics (2 units)
  • N. Racquetball (2 units)
  • P. Skiing-Alpine (Field trips required.) (2 units)
  • Q. Skiing-Nordic (Field trips required.) (2 units)
  • S. Tennis (2 units)
114. Physical Fitness and Conditioning Activities
Principles, practices and individual evaluation in a variety of fitness and conditioning activities. Graded ABC/no credit. (GE=E3)
  • A. Body conditioning (2 units)
  • B. Circuit training (2 units)
  • C. Jogging (2 units)
  • E. Weight training (2 units)
  • F. Yoga (2 units)
120. Somatic and Martial Arts Activities
Instruction and practice in the basic skills and techniques utilized in selected somatic and martial arts movement forms. Graded ABC/no credit. (GE=E3)
  • A. Aikido (2 units)
  • B. T'ai Chi (2 units)
  • C. Capoeira (2 units)
  • D. Judo (2 units)
  • E. Karate (2 units)
  • F. Self-Defense (2 units)
  • G. Cardio-Arts (2 units)
  • H. Fencing (2 units)
  • I. Wrestling (2 units)
  • J. Pilates (2 units)
  • K. Tae Kwon Do (2 units)
  • L. Sampler (2 units)
121. Team Activities
Basic skills, techniques, rules and strategies of selected team sports achieved through participation. Graded ABC/no credit. (GE=E3)
  • A. Basketball (2 units)
  • C. Flag football (2 units)
  • F. Soccer (2 units)
  • G. Softball (2 units)
  • J. Team handball (2 units)
  • K. Volleyball (2 units)
137. Aquatic Activities
Instruction and practice of basic skills and techniques used in aquatic activities. Graded ABC/no credit. (GE=E3)
  • A. Lifeguard training. (Red Cross certification available.) (2 units)
  • C. Basic and emergency water safety. (Red Cross certification available.) (2 units)
  • D. Boating and canoeing. (Field trips required. Red Cross certification available.) (2 units)
  • F. Scuba diving. (Field trips required. NAUI certification available. Doctor's physical examination required.) Prerequisite: skin diving or consent of instructor. (2 units)
  • G. Skin diving. (Field trips required. NAUI certification available.) (2 units)
  • H. Springboard diving. (2 units)
  • J. Swimming. (Red Cross certification available.) (2 units)
  • K. Water polo. (2 units)
  • L. Advanced Swimming for Fitness. Intended for those who have already taken an introductory swim class or who have prior swimming ability. Advanced swimming drill and lap swim workouts. (2 units)
146. Outdoor Skills Activities
Introduction to and practice of basic skills, equipment and safety techniques common to the spectrum of outdoor/wilderness activities. Field trips required. Graded ABC/no credit.
  1. Backpacking (2 units)
  2. Camping (2 units)
  3. Mountaineering (2 units)
  4. Orienteering (2 units)
  5. Survival Skills (2 units)
147. A Fitness Odyssey
A self-paced exercise program and/or plan of study for the mature adult. Programs designed to fit individual life style needs on a contract basis following examination of past and present activity patterns. Graded ABC/no credit. (GE=E3) (2 units)
148. Leisure Sports
Mild to moderately active leisure activities suited to the capabilities and interests of the mature adult. Graded ABC/no credit. (2 units)
149. Independent Activity Project
Activity project designed to satisfy individual needs of students who cannot meet requirements of a regular activity class due to a medical, physical or other conflict; under the supervision of a faculty member. Graded ABC/no credit. Prerequisite: consent of department chair. (GE=E3) (2 units)
150. Dance Activities
Development of proficiency and practice in basic dance skills including the exploration, expression and creativity of movement as utilized in a variety of dance forms. Graded ABC/no credit. Formerly KINE 141. (GE=E3)
  1. Aerobic (2 units)
  2. Low-Impact Aerobic (2 units)
  3. Step Aerobic (2 units)
  4. Ballet (2 units)
  5. Ethnic (2 units)
  6. Jazz (2 units)
  7. Modern (2 units)
  8. Tap (2 units)
  9. Country and Western (2 units)
  10. Sampler (2 units)
  11. Social (2 units)
160. Women's Intercollegiate Activities
Enrollment limited to members of intercollegiate sports teams. The intercollegiate activity units may not be substituted for physical education activity units in the undergraduate degree requirements. Volleyball, cross country, basketball, tennis, softball, water polo, soccer. Graded ABC/no credit. May be repeated. (2 units)
190. Men's Intercollegiate Activities
Enrollment limited to members of intercollegiate sports teams. The intercollegiate activity units may not be substituted for physical education activity units in the undergraduate degree requirements. Soccer, basketball, golf, baseball. Graded ABC/no credit. May be repeated. (2 units)
200. First Aid
Introduction to the emergency care and treatment of illnesses and injuries including training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). May lead to certification in Standard First Aid from the American Red Cross and/or CPR from the American Heart Association. (2 units)
203. Introduction to Recreation
Orientation to recreation as a profession. Meaning, content, history, philosophy and scope of the field of recreation. (4 units)
205. Foundations for Lifetime Fitness and Wellness
Introduction and discussion of the interrelationship of physical fitness and wellness. Benefits associated with physical activity, and how exercise on a regular basis contributes to the development of healthier lifestyles. Topics include: components of physical fitness (including assessment techniques), weight control, nutrition, stress management, health benefits of active lifestyles, and exercise guidelines for each area of fitness. (GE=E1) (2 units)
210. Introduction to Kinesiology
Provides an overview of the discipline of kinesiology. Formerly KINE 210A. Two hours lecture. (2 units)
237. Water Safety Instruction
Materials and methods in organizing school, community and camp aquatic programs. Supervised practice in teaching aquatics. Meets standards for Red Cross certification. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: KINE 137A or 137C or equivalent. (2 units)
240. Exercise Science Software
Examination and analysis of computer software utilized in exercise science, physical education and athletics. Content is consistent with skills necessary to prepare students as health fitness instructors by the American College of Sports Medicine. Four hours activity. (2 units)
254. Field Experience
Supervised off-campus observational field experience in a teaching, fitness or recreation setting. One hour lecture and three hours of observation. (2 units)
261. Professional Activity Preparation in Individual and Dual Sports/Movement Forms
The development of the fundamental techniques and skills for teaching these activities.
  • A. Archery (2 units)
  • B. Badminton (2 units)
  • C. Dance (2 units)
  • E. Golf (2 units)
  • F. Gymnastics (2 units)
  • G. Racquetball (2 units)
  • H. Swimming. Prerequisites: KINE 137A, 137C, 137J, 137K or 137L. (2 units)
  • J. Tennis (2 units)
  • K. Track and Field (2 units)
  • L. Aerobic Exercise (2 units)
  • M. Martial Arts (2 units)
  • N. Strength and Conditioning (2 units)
  • O. Yoga (2 units)
263. Professional Activity Preparation of Team Sports
The development of the fundamental techniques and skills for teaching these activities.
  1. Basketball (2 units)
  2. Football (Flag) (2 units)
  3. Soccer (2 units)
  4. Softball (2 units)
  5. Volleyball (2 units)
267. Sports Officiating
An introduction to contest rules and mechanics of officiating for selected sports. Personal and philosophical bases for successful officiating are examined. (2 units)
270. Introduction to Fitness and Testing
Understanding the scientific basis for assessing physical conditional, fitness, and strength development. Acquisition of the skills and techniques necessary for designing and evaluating fitness programs for specific applications. Four hours activity. (2 units)
271. Recreation Leadership
Organization, supervision and administration of recreation programs and practical experience in recreation situations which provide the opportunity to develop leadership skills. (4 units)
277. Recreation Programming
Materials and methods used in planning and conducting programs in recreation, such as social recreation, dramatics, arts and sports. Prerequisite: KINE 203 or 271. (4 units)

Upper Division

301. Service Learning in Kinesiology
Supervised activities in Kinesiology that provide service to campus or community constituents based on field experiences for students to link their coursework with the discipline of Kinesiology. Graded ABC/no credit. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: KINE 210. (2 units)
305. Prevention and Treatment of Sports Injuries
Theories and methods in the prevention, assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of sports injuries. Four hours lecture, laboratory experiences included. Formerly KINE 280. Materials fee required. Prerequisites: BIOL 223 and 224. (4 units)
310. History and Philosophy of Physical Activity
The evolution of sport and physical activity including historical and philosophical influences from ancient societies through the present. Four hours lecture. (4 units)
311. Introduction to Adapted Physical Education
Provides an overview of adapted physical education. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for KINE 210B. Three hours lecture and two hours field experiences with individuals with disabilities. (4 units)
323. Sociology of Physical Activity
Sociocultural aspects of sport and physical activity, including socialization process, social issues, reflection of social values and interaction with other social institutions. Four hours lecture. (4 units)
324. Psychology of Physical Activity
A behavioral science perspective is used to examine sport and physical activity, including motivation, personality, anxiety, aggression, group cohesion. Includes theoretical foundations and practical application. Four hours lecture. (4 units)
325. Motor Development Across the Lifespan
Concepts of growth and motor development of human beings throughout the lifespan. Major emphasis on the period of birth through adolescence. Four hours lecture with demonstrations. (4 units)
330. Movement Skill Assessment for Individuals with Disabilities
Analysis of motor skills for the purpose of conducting meaningful assessment for individuals with disabilities. Prerequisites: KINE 311. (4 units)
331. Topics in Adapted Physical Education
Analysis of medical aspects and application of instructional strategies relevant to teaching and assessing motor skills in individuals with disabilities. Prerequisite: KINE 311.
  1. Adapted Aquatics (American Red Cross certification) (2 units)
  2. Physical Disabilities (2 units)
  3. Disabilities in Learning (2 units)
  4. Disabilities in Communication (2 units)
  5. Severe and Profound Disabilities (2 units)
332. The Nature and Issues Concerning Individuals with Disabilities
Key initial adapted physical education core competencies about the nature and issues associated with disabling conditions across the lifespan. Required for the California Adapted Physical Education Specialist Credential. (4 units)
333. Applied Behavior Management
Applied behavior management strategies that have relevance and application to teaching physical education. Strategies to manage, motivate, and teach responsible behaviors in a variety of physical activity settings for individuals with and without disabilities. Emphasis is on single-subject applied research design. Course required for the California Adapted Physical Education Specialist Credential. (4 units)
334. Seminar in Adapted Physical Activity
Selected topics and personalities, both enduring and contemporary and significant to adapted physical activity (APA) and adapted physical education (APE). Course required for the California Adapted Physical Education authorization. (4 units)
343. Methods and Techniques of Coaching
Strategies, practice organization and planning for coaching of athletic teams. The purpose of school athletics, public relations responsibilities and personal qualities for success are examined. (4 units)
352. Movement for Children
The study and analysis of movement for children. Includes the structure of movement, the integration of movement activities and the human development aspects of movement. (4 units)
360. Physical Activity and Aging
Examination of the neurological and physiological changes associated with the aging process from post-adolescence through the senior years. Includes information concerning special planning, implementing and evaluation of adult oriented physical activity programs. Content is consistent with skills necessary to prepare students as a health and fitness specialist by the American College of Sports Medicine. Two hours lecture. (2 units)
365. Outdoor Education and Camp Leadership
Knowledge, concepts and techniques for the administration and organization of camps and for working with people in the out-of-doors. Includes a supervised leadership experience and field trips to observe camp facilities, programs and resources. (4 units)
370. Measurement and Statistics in Kinesiology
Selection, application and interpretation of evaluative measures used in pedagogical and in exercise science settings. Includes both descriptive and inferential statistics. Specific attention will be given to parametric techniques. Four hours lecture. Prerequisites: completion of the general education requirement in mathematics. (4 units)
380. Advanced Assessment and Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries
Study of specific techniques of injury evaluation and assessment. Development and application of rehabilitation programs. Four hours lecture plus eight hours of arranged fieldwork per week. Prerequisite: KINE 305. (4 units)
382. Nutrition for Health, Fitness and Sports
Addresses nutrition needs of active people and athletes. Topics include, but not limited to macro and micro nutrient requirements for fitness and sport, popular nutrition supplements and ergogenic aids. (Also offered as HSCI 382. Students may not receive credit for both.) Four hours lecture. Recommended: BIOL 224. (4 units)
385. Diversity Issues in Sport and Physical Activity
Exploration of how historical and contemporary forces in society have shaped the opportunities and experiences of various cultural groupings in American sport and physical activity settings. Focuses primarily on diversity issues related to race, gender, social class, sexuality, religion and physical ability/disability in American sport. (4 units)
410. Motor Control and Skill Learning
A psychological and neurological level of analysis of the factors that influence the acquisition and retention of gross motor skills with emphasis on the role of the sensory and motor control reflexes. Content is consistent with skills necessary to prepare students as a health and fitness specialist by the American College of Sports Medicine. Four hours lecture. Formerly KINE 320. (4 units)
454. Field Experience II
Supervised leadership experience in a teaching or fitness setting. Prerequisite: KINE 254 or consent of instructor. (3 units)
471. Exercise Science Program Management
Management and supervisory philosophies involved in administering fitness facilities. Includes scheduling, budgeting, public relations, legal liability, planning, supervision of personnel, and evaluation of programs and personnel. Four hours lecture. (4 units)
472. Program Design in Physical Education
Basic skills necessary to design, implement and evaluate effective physical education programs in public schools. Formerly KINE 470. Four hours lecture. Prerequisites: KINE 210 and 254. (4 units)
473. Instructional Strategies in Physical Education
Prepares future physical educators with skills to translate goals and objectives in the teaching-learning process into effective teaching behaviors. Four hours lecture. Formerly KINE 355. (4 units)
479. Qualitative Biomechanics
Analysis of movement and application of physical laws to human performance from a qualitative perspective. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL 223, 224 and MATH 110. (5 units)
480. Biomechanics
Application of physical laws to human performance; analytical and quantitative processes emphasized. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: MATH 110. Recommended: MATH 120 and PHYS 100. (5 units)
481. Exercise Physiology
Effects of physical activity on the physiological systems of the human body. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL 223 and 224. (5 units)
482. Contemporary Fitness Programs
Analysis of contemporary methods and technologies used in fitness programs. Critiques made in light of research findings and practical applications. (4 units)
483. Exercise Prescription
Development of assessment skills, exercise prescription modules and training schedules for normal, high level fitness and special populations. Content is consistent with skills necessary to prepare students as a health and fitness specialist by the American College of Sports Medicine. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Materials fee required. Prerequisites: KINE 481, 485, and 486. (4 units)
485. EKG Interpretation
Introduction to electrocardiography. Basic concepts of EKG interpretation including electro-physiology, arrhythmia, electrode placement for both resting and graded exercise testing. Content is consistent with skills necessary to prepare students as a health and fitness specialist by the American College of Sports Medicine. Materials fee required. Four hours activity. Laboratory included. Prerequisite: KINE 481. (2 units)
486. Instrumentation in Exercise Science
Prepares students to calibrate and operate basic physiological equipment used in fitness assessment. Content is consistent with skills necessary to prepare students as a health and fitness specialist by the American College of Sports Medicine. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory. Materials fee required. Prerequisites: KINE 481 and 485. (2 units)
488. Legal Issues in Exercise Science
The legal system as applied to sport and exercise. Legal liabilities, risk management, defenses against negligence in sport/exercise litigation, and case law relating to selected topics such as facilities, equipment, client injuries. Two hours lecture. (2 units)
490. Senior Seminar in Kinesiology
Selected topics significant to the discipline of kinesiology. Formerly PE 490. Two hours seminar. Prerequisite: senior standing or consent of instructor. (2 units)
493. Internship
Directed clinical experience at selected cooperating agencies. Experience in exercise testing, monitoring, and programming for selected populations including but not limited to: healthy individuals, cardiac rehabilitation patients, and athletes. Content is consistent with skills necessary to prepare students as health fitness instructors by the American College of Sports Medicine. Requires six hours per week of approved supervised experience. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. A total of six units may be applied toward the degree. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (2 units)
499. Methods and Materials in the Teaching of Physical Education
Individualized instruction in the methods and materials for the teaching of physical education. Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing and admission to the Single Subject Credential Program or consent of the College of Natural Sciences. (4 units)
580. Exercise, Energy and Human Performance
Energy demands and dietary adjustments required in physical performance with emphasis on high intensity activities. Consideration of climactic factors, ergogenic aids and synthetic substance ingestion. Prerequisite: KINE 481. (4 units)
595. Independent Study
Experimental effort, field or library research conducted under the direction of a faculty member. A total of six units may apply toward graduation. Prerequisites: a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0, consent of instructor and departmental approval of a written proposal of a project submitted on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken. (1-4 units)

Graduate level courses can be found on Page 505 of the 2012-2014 Bulletin of Courses.

For more information please visit our website. Department of Kinesiology