Course Offerings

ADMINISTRATION (ADMN)

Upper Division

501. Quantitative Methods for Managers
A review of major analytical methods used by managers to facilitate their decision making, including accounting, finance, operations and other decision science tools. (4 units)
502. Managerial Communication and Policy
A review and integration of the managerial areas of human resource management, marketing, organizational communication, negotiation skills, and policy and strategy into a decision-making framework that is bound by legal, ethical and global considerations. (4 units)
575. Internship
Supervised work and study in private or public organizations. May be repeated once for credit. A total of two College of Business and Public Administration 575 courses may be applied toward graduation. Graded credit/no credit. Prerequisites: senior standing preferred; consent of instructor and the departments internship coordinator. (4 units)
580. Doing Business Internationally
Introduction to and comparison of the distinctive characteristics of the business environment, business operations, financial institutions, regulations, and culture of different regions of the world. Includes study abroad as the conclusion of the course.
  1. Asia. Formerly a topic under ADMN 590. (2 or 4 units)
  2. India. Formerly a topic under ADMN 590. (2 or 4 units)
  3. Europe. Formerly a topic under ADMN 590. (2 or 4 units)
  4. Africa. (2 or 4 units)
  5. Latin America. (2 or 4 units)
  6. Middle East. (2 or 4 units)
  7. Korea (2 or 4 units)

590. Seminar in Administration
Intensive study of some phase of administration to be developed by instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (2-4 units)

ECONOMICS (ECON)

Lower Division

104. Economics of Social Issues
Economic perspectives on social issues. Cannot be counted toward fulfillment of requirements in the economics major. (GE=D4) (4 units)
200. Principles of Microeconomics
Introduction to the economic principles which govern production, exchange, the pricing of goods, services and resources and the distribution of incomes in competitive and noncompetitive markets. (4 units)
202. Principles of Macroeconomics
Introduction to the theory of national income determination with particular emphasis on employment and unemployment, price levels, monetary and fiscal policies, international economic issues and theories of economic growth. (4 units)
250. Statistics for Economists
Introduction to the statistical tools and data used by economists. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Prerequisite: MATH 110. (4 units)

Upper Division

300. Intermediate Macroeconomics
Analysis of the problems of measurement and determination of levels of national income, and investigation of macroeconomic policy issues including inflation and unemployment. Prerequisites: ECON 200, 202 and MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211. (4 units)
302. Intermediate Microeconomics
Detailed analysis of economic behavior of consumers and producers in competitive and noncompetitive markets, and of the criteria for achieving optimality in the allocation and use of resources. Prerequisites: ECON 200, 202 and MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211. (4 units)
311. Economics in the Elementary and Middle School
Introduces liberal studies students to economics in the California History/Social Science Standards. Students learn to integrate economic principles and theories with the other social sciences. May not be counted toward fulfillment of requirements in the economics major. (4 units)
322. Managerial Economics
Application of microeconomic theory and analysis to business and administrative problems. Prerequisites: ECON 200, 202, 335 and MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211. (4 units)
333. Political Economy of Women: Money, Sex, Race, and Power
Examination of women's economic status. History of women of various races in the U.S. political economy. Exploration of alternative policies. (4 units)
335. Tools of Economic Analysis
Using current software and basic economic models to investigate and analyze economic phenomena. Prerequisites: ECON 200, 202 and MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211. (4 units)
340. Advanced Tools of Economic Analysis
Advanced formulation, construction, and application of computer models using economics concepts and principles. Prerequisite: ECON 335 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
352. Political Economy of Poverty and Discrimination
An exploration of the causes of poverty and discrimination in the United States. Historical examination of the policies addressing poverty and discrimination. Analysis of alternative policies. (GE=G2) (4 units)
357. Political Economy of Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgendered People
Examination of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered (LGBT) households and individuals within the economy, including topics such as "gay consumer market," the division of labor within LGBT households, and discrimination based on sexual orientation. (Also offered as GSS 357. Students may not receive credit for both.) (4 units)
360. Economics of the Environment
Economic causes and implications of air and water pollution, urban congestion, natural resource depletion and population growth; examination of the economic impacts of alternative forms of environmental control and protection. (4 units)
372. Business Cycles
Application of macroeconomic theory, study of cyclical indicators, and use of software to examine the causes and origins of short-run fluctuations in aggregate economic activity. Prerequisites: ECON 200, 202, 335 and MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211. (4 units)
390. Selected Topics in Economics
Examination of selected topics of current interest in economics. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (4 units)
410. Money and Banking
Demand for money, creation and manipulation of the money supply, and the role of banking and other financial institutions in the United States in determining the level of employment, prices and international payments equilibrium. (4 units)
421. Economic History of the United States
Economic history of the United States from the founding of the colonies to the present. (4 units)
430. International Economics
Theories of the causes and effects of trade between nations. Study of government policies which alter the pattern of trade between nations. Prerequisites: ECON 200 and 202. (4 units)
435. Multinational Corporations
Multinational corporations and the international economic environment in which they operate. Topics include the international monetary system, balance of payments, international capital movements, foreign direct investment, technology transfer, and conflicts between multinational corporations and host countries. (4 units)
443. Origins of Political Economy
Economic theories of Karl Marx and the intellectual, political, and economic context in which they developed. Formerly a topic under ECON 390. (4 units)
445. Political Economy
Post-1880s developments in political economy. Topics may include the class structure of modern capitalism, theories of the state, imperialism, monopoly capital, the labor process, and globalization. (4 units)
450. Global Economy
Examines factors that give rise to uneven economic growth and economic interdependence among nations. Investigates the organizations and rules of conduct of the global economy. Assesses the costs and benefits of globalization to nations. (4 units)
460. Labor Economics
Micro- and macroeconomic aspects of labor markets including the workings of labor markets in competitive and noncompetitive markets, structure and causes of unemployment, incomes policies, and selected institutional topics including the economics of U.S. labor movements. Prerequisite: ECON 200. (4 units)
475. Public Finance
Rationale for government actions in an economy which emphasizes private sector allocation; principles of taxation, theories of tax incidence, expenditure evaluation, government sources and uses of revenue, and government budgeting. Prerequisite: ECON 200 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
480. Quantitative Methods in Economics
Application of mathematical tools and concepts in formulating and solving economic problems. Prerequisites: ECON 200, 202, and MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211. (4 units)
490. Introduction to Econometrics
Various statistical methods of testing economic hypotheses. Prerequisites: ECON 200, 202; MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211; and ECON 250 or SCM 210, or equivalent. (4 units)
500. History of Economic Thought
Survey of the development of economic doctrines and analyses and concurrent intellectual and social history with emphasis on the ideas of landmark economists from Adam Smith to John Maynard Keynes. (4 units)
503. Economic Analysis
An intensive introduction to micro- and macroeconomic concepts for graduate students. Not open to students who have received credit for ECON 200 and 202. Prerequisite: graduate standing. (4 units)
510. Economics in the Classroom
Economics method of analysis as it applies to 7th through 12th grade California History/Social Science Standards. (4 units)
520. Social Economics
Study of the social, cultural, and political context of economic behavior. Primary focus on the work of Social Economists, Institutionalists, and Post Keynesians. (4 units)
530. The Good Economy
Standards used to judge an economy as good or bad including utilitarian, neoclassical welfare economics, Rawlsian, neo-Aristotelian, and/or postmodernist approaches. Formerly a topic under ECON 390. (4 units)
540. The Political Economy of Latin America
Study of the economic history and contemporary political economy of Latin America. Theories of imperialism and development, common policy prescriptions (import substitution and Neoliberalism), and popular political movements (e.g. Socialist, Sandinista, Bolivarian) will be integrated into an explanation of the region and selected countries. Formerly a topic under ECON 390. (4 units)
545. Economics of Water Resources
Economics of water resources and related policies, with special emphasis on California where water is a scarce resource. Topics include: water supply and economic growth; urban demand for water; watermarkets; and water benefit cost analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 200 and 503, or consent of instructor. (4 units)
571. Economics of Sports
Investigation of professional and amateur sports using economic analysis, including topics such as the impact of media, player-management relations and unionization, the determination of player salaries, and public financing of new arenas and stadiums. Formerly a topic under ECON 390. (4 units)
573. Economics of Crime
Economic analysis of criminal behavior, the criminal legal system, and government anti-crime policies, including topics such as the economic costs and benefits of sentencing policies, capital punishment, drug enforcement laws, and the criminal justice system budgets. Formerly a topic under ECON 390. (4 units)
575. Internship in Economics
Supervised work in public or private organizations emphasizing practical applications of economic concepts and relationships. May be repeated once for credit. Graded credit/no credit. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and departmental approval of a written proposal submitted on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken. (4 units)
590. Seminar in Economics
Intensive study of some phase of economics. May be repeated for credit as subject matter changes and with consent of instructor. (4 units)
595. Independent Study
Investigation of special topics not covered by the department's curricular offerings. A total of eight units in ECON 595 may be applied toward the major and graduation. Prerequisites: a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0, consent of instructor and departmental approval of a written proposal of a project submitted on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken. (1-4 units)
597. Senior Honors Project
Original research in an area of economics, culminating in a major report receiving approval of the economics faculty. Enrollment limited to students whose formal application for admission to the course has been approved by the department chair. (4 units)

FINANCE (FIN)

Lower Division

101. Financial Choices in Life
An introduction to how financial choices affect lifestyle decisions, economic stress, and wellbeing. Topics include how students deal with credit cards, student loans, leasing vs. buying cars, insurance, employee benefits, housing, investments, and retirement decisions. (GE=E2) (2 units)

Upper Division

Enrollment in upper-division courses restricted to students who have met all prerequisites and have completed at least 90 quarter units (junior class level). Students who do not meet these requirements will be disenrolled.

313. Business Finance
Basic principles of financial analysis for management. Techniques of financial decision-making for liquidity management, financial forecasting, dividend policy and selection of sources of capital. Prerequisites: ACCT 212 or 312, MATH 110 and SCM 210. (4 units)
314. Corporate Financial Management
An advanced study of internal business financial policies and decisions. Includes: capital budgeting, sources and forms of long-term financing, financial structure, cost of capital, equity management, and mergers and acquisitions. Prerequisite: FIN 313. (4 units)
355. Business and Asian Culture
Practical approach to doing business with Asian countries and communities by introducing their historical, cultural, and business contexts. Topics also include the historical experiences and cultural contributions of Asian Americans to American society, and international business practices including documentation, customs clearance procedures, shipping, the methods and instruments of payment, and international commercial terms. (Also offered as FIN 555. Students may not receive credit for both.) Students in FIN 555 must complete additional requirements (4 units)
360. Financial Planning Process and Insurance
Modern money management with discussion of budgeting, banking, real estate, insurance, consumer credit, retirement, and estate planning. The course also examines the identification of risk exposures and the various tools used to address these risks. Prerequisite: FIN 313. (4 units)
380. Principles of Real Estate
Basic issues in real estate, including legal concepts, appraisal, financing, investment, brokerage, and management of real estate. This class also contributes toward the state requirements for pre-license education. Prerequisite: FIN 313 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
420. Entrepreneurial Finance
Financing business start-ups and entrepreneurial projects. Topics include business plan, venture capital markets, funding cycles, financial statement analysis, financial management, valuation of firms, and exit strategy. Prerequisites: FIN 313 and 314 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
430. Financial Theory and Practice
Financial management with application to capital markets, financial planning, capital budgeting, capital structure, portfolio selection and managerial problems. Prerequisites: FIN 313 and 314. (4 units)
432. Financial Institutions and Capital Formation
Structure, operations, portfolio compositions and problems of financial intermediaries and markets. Prerequisites: FIN 313 and 314. (4 units)
433. International Business Finance
Financial operations of multinational businesses with emphasis on foreign exchange mechanics, funds transmission, financing instruments, institutions and markets, capital investment decisions and special problems facing a firm in this unique environment. Three hours lecture and two hours activity laboratory. Prerequisite: FIN 313. (4 units)
435. Investment Analysis
Analysis and forecasting of security markets, industry studies, portfolio construction. Three hours lecture and two hours activity laboratory. Prerequisites: FIN 313, 314, 430 and the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
445. Financial Analysis and Decision-Making
Decision-making in financial management. Advanced financial applications and analysis, including reporting and presentations. Students are advised to take this course near the end of their program. Three hours lecture and two hours activity laboratory. Prerequisites: FIN 430 and the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
460. Retirement Planning
Analysis of key issues in retirement planning: Individual Retirement Accounts, 401k's, defined benefit plans, profit sharing plans, and other retirement planning instruments. Prerequisite: FIN 360. (4 units)
480. Real Estate Appraisal
Examines the appropriate methodology for determining the value of real estate, including both theory and practice. A foundation for potential licensing and certification will be developed. Meets requirement for California Broker Credit. Prerequisite: FIN 313. (4 units)
481. Real Estate Practice
Legal, marketing and financial aspects of running a real estate business. Focus will be on the practical application of real estate theory to the operation of the firm. Meets state requirements applicable toward the real estate broker license. (4 units)
482. Real Estate Development
Aspects of the real estate development process from the location of the property to the best use of the property. (4 units)
485. Legal Aspects of Real Estate
Legal aspects of real estate transactions will be emphasized. Legal considerations of listing contracts, purchase agreements, disclosure requirements, trust deeds, promissory notes and agency will be the key topics. Liability exposures to all parties will also be explored in the real estate transaction. California Broker credit can also be received. (4 units)
503. Financial Management Concepts
An introductory course in financial management with an emphasis on concepts, tools and strategies underlying corporate financial decision-making. Topics include techniques used by firms in procuring and allocating capital for short-term and long-term operations. No credit will be awarded to students who have had FIN 313 and 314. May not be counted toward fulfilling requirements for any degree program offered by the College of Business and Public Administration. Prerequisite: ACCT 503. (4 units)
523. Security Trading and Analysis
An applied investment analysis course, emphasizing the application of modern portfolio theory and asset allocation models in selecting and evaluating stocks and bonds. This web-enhanced course utilizes modern computer and data facilities to conduct extensive fundamental and technical analysis, security portfolio tracking, performance measurement, and trading simulation and strategies. Prerequisite: FIN 503 or equivalent. (4 units)
527. Financial Derivatives
Managing individual stock and stock portfolio price risks, interest rate risk, currency exchange-rate risk, and other financial risks using options, futures, forwards, and swaps. Emphasis on hedging risk than on speculative uses of financial derivatives. Prerequisites: FIN 313 and 314 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
534. Export-Import Financing
International complexities of exporting and importing. Emphasis on the benefits of international trade, the various ways to enter the global market, project financing, trading blocs and investment strategies, components of an export-import quotation, methods of payment, imports, exports, contracts and public and private assistance programs. Prerequisite: FIN 313. (4 units)
546. Student Managed Investment Fund
Gain hands-on investment experience in managing real money. Learn to be an equity analyst and junior portfolio manager. Build an investment portfolio by selecting securities from the equity and bond markets. May be repeated for a total of four units. Prerequisite: consent of department. (2 units)
555. Trade and Business in Asia
Practical approach to doing business with Asian countries and communities by introducing their historical, cultural, and business contexts. Topics also include the historical experiences and cultural contributions of Asian Americans to American society, and international business practices including documentation, customs clearance procedures, shipping, the methods and instruments of payment, and international commercial terms. (Also offered as FIN 355. Students may not receive credit for both.) (4 units)
575. Internship in Finance
Supervised work and study in private or public organizations. May be repeated once for credit. A total of two College of Business and Public Administration 575 courses may be applied toward graduation. Graded credit/no credit. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and the department's internship coordinator. (4 units)
585. Real Estate Finance
Financial aspects of real estate investment, including analysis of investment characteristics, lending environment, financial instruments, and effective loan proposals. Three hours lecture and two hours activity laboratory. Prerequisite: FIN 313 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
590. Seminar in Finance
An intensive study of some phase of finance to be developed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (4 units)
595. Independent Study
Special topics involving library and/or field research. A total of 10 units in any College of Business and Public Administration 595 may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0, consent of instructor and approval by the department of a written project/proposal submitted to the appropriate department in the College of Business and Public Administration on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken. (2 or 4 units)

FINANCE (FIN)

Lower Division

101. Financial Choices in Life
An introduction to how financial choices affect lifestyle decisions, economic stress, and wellbeing. Topics include how students deal with credit cards, student loans, leasing vs. buying cars, insurance, employee benefits, housing, investments, and retirement decisions. (GE=E2) (2 units)

Upper Division

Enrollment in upper-division courses restricted to students who have met all prerequisites and have completed at least 90 quarter units (junior class level). Students who do not meet these requirements will be disenrolled.

313. Business Finance
Basic principles of financial analysis for management. Techniques of financial decision-making for liquidity management, financial forecasting, dividend policy and selection of sources of capital. Prerequisites: ACCT 212 or 312, MATH 110 and SCM 210. (4 units)
314. Corporate Financial Management
An advanced study of internal business financial policies and decisions. Includes: capital budgeting, sources and forms of long-term financing, financial structure, cost of capital, equity management, and mergers and acquisitions. Prerequisite: FIN 313. (4 units)
355. Business and Asian Culture
Practical approach to doing business with Asian countries and communities by introducing their historical, cultural, and business contexts. Topics also include the historical experiences and cultural contributions of Asian Americans to American society, and international business practices including documentation, customs clearance procedures, shipping, the methods and instruments of payment, and international commercial terms. (Also offered as FIN 555. Students may not receive credit for both.) Students in FIN 555 must complete additional requirements (4 units)
360. Financial Planning Process and Insurance
Modern money management with discussion of budgeting, banking, real estate, insurance, consumer credit, retirement, and estate planning. The course also examines the identification of risk exposures and the various tools used to address these risks. Prerequisite: FIN 313. (4 units)
380. Principles of Real Estate
Basic issues in real estate, including legal concepts, appraisal, financing, investment, brokerage, and management of real estate. This class also contributes toward the state requirements for pre-license education. Prerequisite: FIN 313 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
420. Entrepreneurial Finance
Financing business start-ups and entrepreneurial projects. Topics include business plan, venture capital markets, funding cycles, financial statement analysis, financial management, valuation of firms, and exit strategy. Prerequisites: FIN 313 and 314 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
430. Financial Theory and Practice
Financial management with application to capital markets, financial planning, capital budgeting, capital structure, portfolio selection and managerial problems. Prerequisites: FIN 313 and 314. (4 units)
432. Financial Institutions and Capital Formation
Structure, operations, portfolio compositions and problems of financial intermediaries and markets. Prerequisites: FIN 313 and 314. (4 units)
433. International Business Finance
Financial operations of multinational businesses with emphasis on foreign exchange mechanics, funds transmission, financing instruments, institutions and markets, capital investment decisions and special problems facing a firm in this unique environment. Three hours lecture and two hours activity laboratory. Prerequisite: FIN 313. (4 units)
435. Investment Analysis
Analysis and forecasting of security markets, industry studies, portfolio construction. Three hours lecture and two hours activity laboratory. Prerequisites: FIN 313, 314, 430 and the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
445. Financial Analysis and Decision-Making
Decision-making in financial management. Advanced financial applications and analysis, including reporting and presentations. Students are advised to take this course near the end of their program. Three hours lecture and two hours activity laboratory. Prerequisites: FIN 430 and the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
460. Retirement Planning
Analysis of key issues in retirement planning: Individual Retirement Accounts, 401k's, defined benefit plans, profit sharing plans, and other retirement planning instruments. Prerequisite: FIN 360. (4 units)
480. Real Estate Appraisal
Examines the appropriate methodology for determining the value of real estate, including both theory and practice. A foundation for potential licensing and certification will be developed. Meets requirement for California Broker Credit. Prerequisite: FIN 313. (4 units)
481. Real Estate Practice
Legal, marketing and financial aspects of running a real estate business. Focus will be on the practical application of real estate theory to the operation of the firm. Meets state requirements applicable toward the real estate broker license. (4 units)
482. Real Estate Development
Aspects of the real estate development process from the location of the property to the best use of the property. (4 units)
485. Legal Aspects of Real Estate
Legal aspects of real estate transactions will be emphasized. Legal considerations of listing contracts, purchase agreements, disclosure requirements, trust deeds, promissory notes and agency will be the key topics. Liability exposures to all parties will also be explored in the real estate transaction. California Broker credit can also be received. (4 units)
503. Financial Management Concepts
An introductory course in financial management with an emphasis on concepts, tools and strategies underlying corporate financial decision-making. Topics include techniques used by firms in procuring and allocating capital for short-term and long-term operations. No credit will be awarded to students who have had FIN 313 and 314. May not be counted toward fulfilling requirements for any degree program offered by the College of Business and Public Administration. Prerequisite: ACCT 503. (4 units)
523. Security Trading and Analysis
An applied investment analysis course, emphasizing the application of modern portfolio theory and asset allocation models in selecting and evaluating stocks and bonds. This web-enhanced course utilizes modern computer and data facilities to conduct extensive fundamental and technical analysis, security portfolio tracking, performance measurement, and trading simulation and strategies. Prerequisite: FIN 503 or equivalent. (4 units)
527. Financial Derivatives
Managing individual stock and stock portfolio price risks, interest rate risk, currency exchange-rate risk, and other financial risks using options, futures, forwards, and swaps. Emphasis on hedging risk than on speculative uses of financial derivatives. Prerequisites: FIN 313 and 314 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
534. Export-Import Financing
International complexities of exporting and importing. Emphasis on the benefits of international trade, the various ways to enter the global market, project financing, trading blocs and investment strategies, components of an export-import quotation, methods of payment, imports, exports, contracts and public and private assistance programs. Prerequisite: FIN 313. (4 units)
546. Student Managed Investment Fund
Gain hands-on investment experience in managing real money. Learn to be an equity analyst and junior portfolio manager. Build an investment portfolio by selecting securities from the equity and bond markets. May be repeated for a total of four units. Prerequisite: consent of department. (2 units)
555. Trade and Business in Asia
Practical approach to doing business with Asian countries and communities by introducing their historical, cultural, and business contexts. Topics also include the historical experiences and cultural contributions of Asian Americans to American society, and international business practices including documentation, customs clearance procedures, shipping, the methods and instruments of payment, and international commercial terms. (Also offered as FIN 355. Students may not receive credit for both.) (4 units)
575. Internship in Finance
Supervised work and study in private or public organizations. May be repeated once for credit. A total of two College of Business and Public Administration 575 courses may be applied toward graduation. Graded credit/no credit. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and the department's internship coordinator. (4 units)
585. Real Estate Finance
Financial aspects of real estate investment, including analysis of investment characteristics, lending environment, financial instruments, and effective loan proposals. Three hours lecture and two hours activity laboratory. Prerequisite: FIN 313 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
590. Seminar in Finance
An intensive study of some phase of finance to be developed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (4 units)
595. Independent Study
Special topics involving library and/or field research. A total of 10 units in any College of Business and Public Administration 595 may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0, consent of instructor and approval by the department of a written project/proposal submitted to the appropriate department in the College of Business and Public Administration on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken. (2 or 4 units)

INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY (IST)

Lower Division

101. Introduction to Information Technology
Introduction to information technology concepts and skills. Survey of current computer hardware and software, their use in organizations, and attending ethical issues. An introduction to popular software applications (word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation graphics). No prior computer experience required. Formerly INFO 102 and 103. Three hours lecture and two hours activity laboratory. (4 units)
150. Web Publishing
Basic web page development and web site planning. Topics include web site planning, web page design and HTML. Students will demonstrate proficiency in web design tools, skills and practices. Formerly INFO 150. Prerequisite: IST 101 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
160. Computer Graphics for the Internet
Introduction to computer graphic design and tools for web page development. Topics include digital photography, graphic design, animation and digital sound for the Internet. Students will demonstrate proficiency in graphic design tools, skills and practices geared to digital and world wide web publishing. Formerly INFO 160. Prerequisite: IST 101 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
274. Data Base Management and Policies
Fundamentals of data base design and use. Topics include data base application in organizations, end user needs analysis, logical data base design, data integrity and data base security. Students design and create working applications using a popular business data base program. Information classification, management and disposal practices are explored. Formerly INFO 274. Prerequisite: IST 101 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
275. Information Networking and Security
Data communications field for the business student including the introductory topics of hardware, software, protocols, channels, modems, local area networks, wide area networks and various applications. Students will gain hands-on experience with current popular data communication systems. Security concepts including policies, access control and network assessment are covered. Formerly INFO 275. Prerequisite: IST 101 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
276. Systems Analysis and Design
Traditional systems analysis and design methods and tools, including the role of the systems analyst, feasibility studies, modeling technique systems design, reporting and documentation, documentation standards, certification testing and system accreditation practices, and implementation strategies. Students will develop conceptual, analytical and practical skills in modeling organizational processes.Formerly IST 276. Prerequisite: IST 101 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
280. Information Mapping and Data Visualization
Introduction to concepts and tools of data visualization. Together with traditional charting and graphing methods, students are introduced to the use of geographic information systems (GIS). Using spatial modeling tools and quantitative methods, the course provides students with practical applications for converting data into information. Formerly INFO 280. Prerequisite: IST 101 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
282. Business Systems I
An introduction to business system development in an object-oriented environment. Emphasizes object-oriented programming in a graphical user interface environment. Object-oriented concepts are applied to computer problem solving. Knowledge of computer programming is not essential. Formerly INFO 282. Prerequisite: IST 101 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
283. Business Systems II
An advanced study of information systems development in an object-oriented environment. Object-oriented concepts are applied to construction of computer solutions for business information systems. Knowledge of computer programming is essential. Formerly INFO 283. Prerequisite: IST 282 or consent of instructor. (4 units)

Upper Division

Enrollment in upper-division courses restricted to students who have met all prerequisites and have completed at least 90 quarter units (junior class level). Students who do not meet these requirements will be disenrolled.
305. Enterprise Systems
Foundation for enterprise systems resource planning and implementation, including supply chain management modeling and operations planning. Students will learn to configure and apply an enterprise systems software. (Also offered as SCM 305. Students may not receive credit for both.) Prerequisite: IST 101. (4 units)
309. Information Systems and Technology
Application of computer systems in organizations. Topics include information systems planning, information forecasting, information technology, information processing, information assurance and security, risk assessment, allocating resources and legal concepts. Formerly INFO 309. Prerequisite: IST 101. (4 units)
372. Information Technology
Basic computer hardware, software, maintenance and training technologies including hardware components, operating system functions, information systems maintenance strategies for the organization, and end-user training options. Security practices such as network access, data disposal, introductory forensics and facilities planning are also explored. Hands-on experience with different computer hardware, operating systems and software utilities. Formerly INFO 372. Prerequisite: IST 309 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
378. Problem Solving and Risk Management
Systematic approaches to problem solving and decision making. Students will learn behavioral and organizational decision making processes relating to their roles as both manager and information systems designer. Topics include recognizing and defining the problem, troubleshooting, individual and group decision making, risk management, incident handling, threat assessment, allocating resources, and implementation strategies. Formerly INFO 378. Prerequisite: IST 309 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
405. Advanced Enterprise Systems
Advanced study of enterprise systems planning in different stages of organizational operations. Students use enterprise planning technology to examine cases in different organizational settings. (Also offered as SCM 405. Students may not receive credit for both.) Prerequisite: IST 305 or SCM 305. (4 units)
410. Information Systems Security Professionals
Advanced study in information assurance and systems security for information systems professionals. Creates a sensitivity to the threats to and vulnerabilities of national security information systems, recognition of the need to protect data, and information for processing them. Designing, executing, and evaluating principles and practices according to Information Security (INFOSEC) standards established by the federal government (CNSS 4011). Formerly INFO 410. Prerequisite: IST 309 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
415. Security Systems Management
Advanced study in the theory and practice of security systems management and the process of approval to operate. Analyze and judge information for the validity and reliability to ensure the system will operate at the proposed level of trust. Topics include information systems architecture, system security measures, system operations policy, system security management planning, legal and ethical considerations, and provisions for system operator and end user training. Course meets Senior Systems Manager (SSM) standards established by the federal government (CNSS 4012). Formerly INFO 415. Prerequisite: IST 410 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
474. Advanced Data Base Management and Information Assurance
Advanced computer data base concepts and skills including: data modeling, Structured Query Language (SQL), and client-server applications. Also covers Data Base System Administration issues: data certification/classification, life cycle, access control, and legal requirements. Students will create applications using an advanced data base program package. Formerly INFO 474. Prerequisites: IST 274 and 309, or consent of instructor. (4 units)
475. Advanced Information Networking and Security
Advanced computer networking and their application in organizations. Students will learn current computer network strategies and create advanced network applications. Security emphasis includes threats and countermeasures, wireless security, security requirements, access control practices. Formerly INFO 475. Prerequisites: IST 275 and 309, or consent of instructor. (4 units)
476. Advanced Systems Analysis and Design
Advanced analysis, design and implementation of information systems for organizations, including data, process and network modeling techniques; structured, information engineering and object-oriented approaches to systems design; systems testing methods; documentation standards, certification testing and system accreditation practices; copyright and legal issues; implementation strategies and project management. Formerly INFO 476. Prerequisites: IST 276 and 309, or consent of instructor. (4 units)
480. Advanced Information Mapping and Visualization
Advanced study in and implementation of data visualization methods. Integration of information mapping, forecasting and data base tools and concepts to solve problems and support decision making. Students will learn and apply a popular geographic information system (GIS) to typical organizational problems. Formerly INFO 480. Prerequisites: IST 280 and 309, or consent of instructor. (4 units)
485. E-Business
Advanced technical and business skills for designing, developing and managing e-business applications. Topics include enterprise systems, business to business exchanges, and implementation strategies. Formerly INFO 485. Prerequisites: IST 150 and 309, or consent of instructor. (4 units)
490. Information Systems Planning and Policy
Advanced study of information systems planning and policy formation for top management. Covers strategic use of information technology in organizations; the theory, methods and practices of enterprise systems planning; and design and implementation of information systems policy. Policy issues surrounding project management, information classification, IT audit, and legal issues related to privacy and security will also be covered. Formerly INFO 490. Prerequisites: completion of all other courses in chosen concentration program and the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
511. Cyber Defense
Advanced study of information assurance and security including methods and practices used by federal and state agencies, and private sector best practices. Topics include: threat assessment, red teaming methods, countermeasures, practices and law. Students will work in simulated environments and will investigate crimes and experience various security scenarios. Formerly a topic under IST/INFO 590. Prerequisites: IST 410 or 610, and the upper-division writing requirement; or consent of instructor. (4 units)
525. Computer Forensics
A systematic inspection of computer systems for evidence of a crime and use in civil litigation. Identify sources of digital evidence, preserve and analyze digital evidence, present findings, and learn tools computer forensics experts use. Formerly a topic under IST/INFO 590. Prerequisites: IST 309, 372, and the upper-division writing requirement; or consent of instructor. (4 units)
575. Internship in Information Systems and Technology
Supervised work and study in private or public organizations. May be repeated once for credit. A total of two College of Business and Public Administration 575 courses may be applied toward graduation. Graded credit/no credit. Formerly INFO 575. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and the department's internship coordinator. (4 units)
590. Seminar in Information Systems and Technology
An intensive study of some phase of information systems and technology to be developed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Formerly INFO 590. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
595. Independent Study
Special topics involving library and/or field research. A total of 10 units in any College of Business and Public Administration 595 may be applied toward graduation. Formerly INFO 595. Prerequisites: a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0, the upper-division writing requirement, consent of instructor and approval by the department of a written project/proposal submitted to the appropriate department in the College of Business and Public Administration on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken. (2 or 4 units)

MANAGEMENT (MGMT)

Lower Division

100. Introduction to Business and Public Administration
Introduction to the administrative process. Strategies to achieve success in business and public careers. Includes the development of administrative theories and practices and provides an overview of the functional areas of business and public administration. Examines the questions of ethics, small business management and the global aspects of administration. (4 units)
230. Business Law
An introduction to statutory and common law developments impacting commercial transactions. Emphasizes principles of contract law and sale of goods under the Uniform Commercial Code. Additional topics include business organizations, commercial paper and secured transactions. (4 units)

Upper Division

Enrollment in upper-division courses restricted to students who have met all prerequisites and have completed at least 90 quarter units (junior class level). Students who do not meet these requirements will be disenrolled.
302. Management and Organizational Behavior
Introduction to management as it affects operations and the behavior of people in relation to the functional fields of administration. Selected behavioral concepts analyzed with respect to applications in management. (Also offered as PSYC 302. Students may not receive credit for both.) (4 units)
306. Expository Writing for Administration
Writing related to business and public administration including documented research reports, summaries and analytical papers. Revision and rewriting will be required. Course fulfills the graduation requirement in writing proficiency. May not be counted for fulfilling concentration requirements for any degree program offered by the College of Business and Public Administration. No more than one of the expository writing courses (EDUC 306, ENG 306, HUM 306, MGMT 306, NSCI 306, SSCI 306) may be taken for credit. Students who have received a grade of no credit in any combination of the expository writing courses two or more times must meet with the 306 coordinator or designee to design a developmental writing plan as a condition for enrolling for a third quarter. All students must obtain junior status at the time of registration or their course request will be cancelled. Graded A, B, C/no credit. Prerequisites: Prerequisite: satisfaction of the GE written communication (A1) requirement and a minimum of 90 quarter (60 semester) units of college credit. (GE=F1) (4 units)
330. Legal Environment of Business
Study of the legal system; nature and source of law as applied to business activity; statutes and significant cases involving business policies; effect of public policies on private enterprise system. Prerequisite: MGMT 230. (4 units)
335. Business and Society
Evaluation of American business systems; legal and social factors influencing business; role of business in alleviating society's problems; problems and issues of current concern regarding women and minorities in management, business and society in a global context. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
350. Administrative Communications
Introduction to communication theory. Concepts, analysis and methods of improvement for interpersonal communication, communication within organizations and communication between organizations and their external environments. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
402. Studies in Organizational Behavior
Review and presentation of selected areas of behavioral science research and its application to management practices. Selected subjects may include: motivation, communication, change and leadership. Prerequisite: MGMT 302 or PSYC 302. (4 units)
405. Managing Across Borders
Identification of the diverse factors and actors that shape the global business environment. Comparative analysis of management practices in various cultures with emphasis on sociocultural, political and economic influences. Balancing of local responsiveness and global integration, and decision-making skills for managing across borders are emphasized. Prerequisite: MGMT 302 or PSYC 302. (4 units)
406. International Business Law
Comparison and contrast of the various dimensions of international business transactions. General legal framework in which international business is conducted; competing national laws and courts systems with respect to a variety of typical international business problems; international institutions and prospects for internationalizing the legal treatment of transnational business operations. (4 units)
407. Comparative Management Systems of the Americas
Comparative analysis of private and public sector organizations and corresponding management systems currently operating throughout the Americas. Examination of the structure and management systems of private and public sector organizations in different American countries and the trade patterns among these nations. (4 units)
408. Managing In Europe
Identification of the diverse factors and actors that shape the business environment in one or more nations in Europe. Comparative analysis of management practices and leadership challenges and approaches for navigating sociocultural, political and economic contexts. (4 units)
442. Small Business Management
Managerial considerations for the small business entrepreneur. Acquisitions, location, legal considerations, finances, taxation, labor relations and other topics. (4 units)
451. Organization and Management Theory
Development and analysis of organization and management theory. Comparative analysis seeking patterns and systematic explanation of differences among organizations. Dynamics of interaction between organizations and environment. Prerequisite: MGMT 302 or PSYC 302. (4 units)
452. Leading Effectively and Ethically
Relevant theories and concepts for leading individuals and groups effectively and for developing ethical awareness to respond appropriately to ethical dilemmas. Prerequisite: MGMT 302. (4 units)
455. Human Resources Management
Policies related to human resources; human resources planning, employee selection and development, performance appraisal, compensation, relationships with unionized employees, collective bargaining. Prerequisites: MGMT 302 or PSYC 302, and the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
456. Developing an Effective Workforce
Theory and practice of employee selection, training, and performance appraisal. Prerequisite: MGMT 455 or PSYC 355. (4 units)
457. Industrial and Labor Relations
Analysis of historical, political, legal, economic and managerial forces which lead to the development of labor unions and collective bargaining. Focus on legal rights of employees and managerial rights of employer. Involves case law and bargaining simulation. (4 units)
458. Fair Employment Practices
An evaluation of fair employment practices in employment. Course emphasizes antidiscriminatory legislation and its application to employer-employee relationships. Prerequisite: MGMT 455. (4 units)
459. Work Group Management
Examination of the dynamics of task-oriented groups in American and international environments, utilizing both conceptual and experiential learning. Prerequisite: MGMT 302 or PSYC 302. (4 units)
470. Strategic Human Resource Management
Capstone course integrating human resource management materials acquired through the required concentration courses and addressing the strategic role of HR professionals in organizations. Prerequisites: MGMT 455; 456 or PSYC 355; and MGMT 458. (4 units)
490. Strategic Management
This college capstone course develops an overall general manager's perspective of strategic management and competitive strategy integrating knowledge from accounting, finance, information and decision sciences, management, marketing, public policy, and supply chain management. Coverage includes competitive strategy for global, national and regional/local business and managerial concerns regarding social and environmental issues. Prerequisites: completion of the upper-division administration core courses (one course may be taken concurrently), the upper-division writing requirement, and senior standing. (4 units)
515. Business Consulting
Supervised consulting assignments designed to provide meaningful business assistance to businesses. Prerequisites: senior status, consent of instructor and college. (4 units)
520. Legal Regulation of Intellectual Property
Analysis of federal, state and international law on intellectual property and technology, including principles of contract law, intellectual law, taxation law, tort law, anti-trust law and criminal law with respect to technology and intellectual property. Prerequisites: MGMT 230 and 330. (4 units)
526. Global Entrepreneurship
Entrepreneurial process in a global context as it relates to recognizing ideas, marshaling resources, developing networks and creating the strategy for a new cross-border venture. (4 units)
541. Commercializing Entrepreneurial Innovation
Examines the process of commercializing innovations and emerging technologies in entrepreneurial driven companies. Focus on understanding the strategy, tactics and behaviors necessary to manage the transition from basic development stages to commercial venture, examining the role of innovation assessment, intellectual property protection, technology transfer and licensing. (4 units)
543. New Venture Opportunity Analysis
Study of the process of defining and identifying the difference between ideas and opportunities including the role of the entrepreneur, ideas, pattern recognition, and the evaluation and screening process that leads to successful commercialization of business concepts and ideas. (4 units)
544. New Venture Development
Introduction to the process of developing a new venture concept. Examines key issues in new venture creation, including the role of the entrepreneur in transitioning ideas to business opportunities. Special emphasis on developing a rapid opportunity analysis, identifying a sustainable business model, and business planning. (4 units)
545. New Venture Resource Requirements
Strategies and techniques employed by entrepreneurs to identify and access critical resources. Special emphasis on marshalling internal and external resources such as advisors, board of directors, and social networks. (4 units)
547. Managing a Growing Business
Study of the basic strategy and tactics to manage growing enterprises while still maintaining an entrepreneurial spirit. Examines the role of management decision making, management control systems, short- and long-term planning, and entrepreneurship in managing growing companies. (4 units)
549. Launching the Entrepreneurial Venture
Process and methods involved in starting and growing new enterprises with emphasis on the attributes of entrepreneurs, entrepreneurial careers and positioning an enterprise for sustainable growth. Prerequisites: MGMT 543 and 544. (4 units)
575. Internship in Management
Supervised work and study in private or public organizations. May be repeated once for credit. A total of two College of Business and Public Administration 575 courses may be applied toward graduation. Graded credit/no credit. Prerequisites: senior standing preferred, consent of instructor and the department's internship coordinator. (4 units)
590. Seminar in Management
Intensive study of some phase of management to be developed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (2-4 units)
595. Independent Study
Special topics involving library and/or field research. A total of 10 units in any College of Business and Public Administration 595 may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0, consent of instructor and approval by the department of a written project/proposal submitted to the appropriate department in the College of Business and Public Administration on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken. (2 or 4 units)
998. Baccalaureate Reflective Essay
Submission of a reflective essay based on departmental guidelines. Prerequisites: completion of or concurrent enrollment in all courses in the student's area of concentration. (0 units)

MARKETING (MKTG)

Upper Division

Enrollment in upper-division courses restricted to students who have met all prerequisites and have completed at least 90 quarter units (junior class level). Students who do not meet these requirements will be disenrolled.
305. Marketing Principles
Overview of the field of marketing and its interactions with other aspects of business. Includes consumer and industrial buying behavior; target marketing, segmentation, positioning, and differentiation; marketing research; product, distribution, promotion, and pricing decisions; industrial, services, and international marketing as well as legal and ethical dimensions. Prerequisite: junior standing. (4 units)
410. Consumer Behavior
Consumer decision processes in the consumptive role including internal and external influences on consumer behavior and marketing strategies. Prerequisite: MKTG 305. (4 units)
415. Product Management
Techniques and processes of product development and product management. Topics include idea generation, screening, design, testing and commercialization. Introduces basic product management techniques such as brand switching, product adoption forecasting, and customer preference specification. Prerequisite: MKTG 305. (4 units)
416. Marketing Research
Marketing research as an activity of information gathering, analysis and interpretation for input into management decision making. Application of current practices and techniques in the marketing research industry. Requires the use of statistical software in class. Prerequisite: MKTG 305. (4 units)
420. Advertising
Stimulation of market demand through advertising media, including printed messages, radio and television, developing the advertising appeal, selecting the media, placing copy and measuring results, as well as legal, ethical and international aspects of advertising. Prerequisites: MKTG 305 and the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
430. Professional Selling and Sales Management
Develops interpersonal communication skills used in the selling of products and services. Skills in prospecting, questioning and listening, understanding needs, demonstrating and explaining products, overcoming objections and closing the sale. Introduces managerial techniques used to supervise a sales force and to analyze company sales. Emphasis on recruitment, training, motivation and evaluation of salespeople. Prerequisites: the upper-division writing requirement and junior standing. (4 units)
436. Marketing Decision-Making
Reinforcing concepts learned in Marketing Principles, students will analyze, evaluate and develop product, price, promotion and physical distribution marketing programs. Emphasis is placed on analytical techniques and case studies to develop effective student decision-making skills in the major functional areas of marketing. Prerequisite: MKTG 305. (4 units)
438. Industrial Marketing
Overview of industrial marketing strategy and management. Emphasis on industrial buyer behavior, market and product planning, pricing strategy, and distribution. Analysis of institutional practices including competitive bidding, request for proposals, negotiation, and channel management. Prerequisite: MKTG 305. (4 units)
446. Advertising Campaign
Development of a full marketing and advertising campaign for a client's regional or national product or service offered as needed basis for student competitions or grant opportunities. Prerequisite: MKTG 305. (4 units)
460. Retailing
History, development, organization and management of retail institutions. Emphasis is on retail store operations, such as location, layout, planning, control of budgets, human resource planning, pricing and customer service. Prerequisite: MKTG 305 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
462. Merchandising
Analysis of merchandise buying. Emphasis is on the buyer's roles, responsibilities and activities. Subjects include merchandise planning, budgeting, inventory control, pricing, vendor relations, and sourcing. Prerequisites: MKTG 305 and consent of instructor. (4 units)
470. International Marketing Management
Marketing strategies for developing global markets including the cultural, political, and economic infrastructure of foreign markets and their impact on traditional marketing decisions. Prerequisite: MKTG 305 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
496. Marketing Planning and Strategy
An integrative approach to strategic marketing management including the planning, design and execution of a comprehensive situation analysis, identification and evaluation of strategic marketing alternatives, and the implementation of marketing plans and programs and an applied knowledge of SPSS or any other data analysis software package. Prerequisites: MKTG 410, 416, 436 and the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
520. Integrated Marketing Communication
An integrated perspective on the process of communicating marketing messages to promote products, services, ideas, people, causes and events. Advertising, direct marketing, personal selling, public relations, and sales promotion strategies are explored with consideration given to global, ethical, and technology-related issues. (Also offered as COMM 520. Students may not receive credit for both.) (4 units)
525. Sports and Entertainment Marketing
Examination of the theoretical and practical aspects of marketing management in the sports and entertainment industry. Formerly a topic under MKTG 590. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
530. Strategic Entrepreneurship
The role of entrepreneurship in today's economy: identifying entrepreneurial opportunities, designing incubator business projects, strategic entrepreneurial alliances and global market strategies for entrepreneurial ventures. The role of marketing mix in the start up and operation of entrepreneurial ventures. Formerly a topic under MKTG 590. Prerequisite: junior standing. (4 units)
540. E-Marketing
Development of a web-based marketing program. Discussion of customer data bases, logistics of E-marketing, and the flow of products, funds, and information in E-channels. Focus is on understanding how goods and services are created and delivered through the web. Formerly a topic under MKTG 590. (4 units)
550. Advanced Sports Marketing Planning and Strategy
An integrative approach to strategic sports marketing management providing theoretical and practical aspects of marketing management in the sports industry. Topics include the planning, design and execution of a comprehensive situation analysis, identification and evaluation of strategic marketing alternatives, and the implementation of marketing plans and programs. Prerequisite: MKTG 525 and the upper-division writing requirement or consent of instructor. (4 units)
555. Advanced Entertainment Marketing Planning and Strategy
An integrative approach to strategic entertainment marketing management providing theoretical and practical aspects of marketing management in the entertainment industry. Topics include the planning, design and execution of a comprehensive situation analysis, identification and evaluation of strategic marketing alternatives, and the implementation of marketing plans and programs. Prerequisites: MKTG 525 and the upper-division writing requirement or consent of instructor. (4 units)
560. Services Marketing
The process of designing and marketing intangible services for profit and non-profit organizations. Emphasis on customer-focused strategies for developing, promoting, pricing and evaluating service mixes in a global context. Prerequisite: junior standing. (4 units)
565. Logistics
Science of movement, storage, delivery and distribution. Topics include channels of distribution, purchasing, customer service, inventory types and functions. Formerly MKTG 450. Prerequisite: MKTG 305. (4 units)
572. Import-Export Management
Current practices and opportunities in importing and exporting goods with emphasis on preparing products for foreign shipment, shipping, necessary documentation and use of free trade zones. Prerequisite: MKTG 305 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
575. Internship in Marketing
Supervised work and study in private or public organizations. May be repeated once for credit. A total of eight units from the College of Business and Public Administration 575 courses may be applied toward graduation. Graded credit/no credit. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and the department's internship coordinator. (2 or 4 units)
590. Seminar in Marketing
An intensive study of some phase of marketing to be developed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (4 units)
595. Independent Study
Special topics involving library and/or field research. A total of 10 units in any College of Business and Public Administration 595 may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0, consent of instructor and approval by the department of a written project/proposal submitted to the appropriate department in the College of Business and Public Administration on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken. (1-5 units)

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (PA)

Upper Division

Enrollment in upper-division courses restricted to students who have met all prerequisites and have completed at least 90 quarter units (junior class level). Students who do not meet these requirements will be disenrolled.
305. Organizations in Multicultural and Diverse Societies
Integrative, multicultural exploration of the challenge of ensuring that business and government organizations as they pursue their economic or public policy missions also promote societal goals of democratic process and full inclusion of women and minorities. Examines the roles and powers of business and government organizations in meeting or failing to meet the rights and needs of citizens of all genders and ethnicities. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. (GE=G2) (4 units)
307. Public Relations in the Public Sector
Public relations as an inherent aspect of management in the public sector. Problems and techniques of administration of programs to manage and improve public relations. (4 units)
315. Government-Business Relations
Description and analysis of government policies affecting business development at local, state and national levels. Discussion of major international trade treaties, trading blocs, and international financial institutions and the impact of globalization on government's involvement with business. (4 units)
380. Introduction to Public Administration
An introduction to the purposes, methods and characteristics of public management, including organization of public services, roles and relationships of public administrators, accountability and the achievement of public goals. (Also offered as PSCI 380. Students may not receive credit for both.) (4 units)
462. Public Personnel Administration
Definition, description and evaluation of government personnel systems; classification, compensation, recruitment, examination, training, working conditions, incentives, performance ratings, public employee organizations and organizational development in the public service. Prerequisites: PA 380 and the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
463. Governmental Budgeting
Role of the budgetary process in government management, the public sector environment of budgeting, budget formulation and administration. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
472. Administrative Law
Processes of administrative rule making, regulation, adjudication and appeal procedures; duties and liabilities of public officials, trends in regulation, overview of regulatory agencies. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
473. Public Transportation Planning, Policy and Regulation
Study of the impacts of local, state and federal planning, policies, rules, regulations, and programs on surface, marine and air transportation systems. The focus is on interrelationships between business and the public sector in the strategic management of transportation applications. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
490. Senior Assessment Seminar in Public Administration
This senior-level capstone course develops an overall general perspective on the field of public administration. It reviews and integrates knowledge from the Public Administration upper-division core and concentration courses. The class assesses and documents students' academic progress in the Public Administration concentration to demonstrate evidence of learning the core theories and practices of public administration as applied to topical areas. Prerequisites: senior standing, the upper-division writing requirement, PA 307, 315, 380, 462, 463 and 472, or consent of instructor. (4 units)
501. Administrative Leadership
Theory and practice of leading public sector organizations. Topics include leader traits, skills, styles, behaviors, development and evaluation. Formerly a topic under PA 590. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
514. Management of Private Nonprofit Organizations
Analyzes the specific problems of management in private nonprofit organizations, including planning, personnel, financial and policy issues. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
516. Public and Non-Profit Project Management
Aspects of project management, including needs and feasibility assessment, project design, proposal writing, contract negotiation, funding, developing project teams, managing team conflict, monitoring, and evaluation. Three hours lecture and two hours activity laboratory. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
521. Principles of Planning
Introduction to local and regional community planning; includes methods of adoption and interorganizational relationships. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
540. Introduction to Tribal Management and Governance
Roles, responsibilities and structure of tribal governments. The historical and legal underpinnings of the inter-governmental relations between the U.S. government and Indian tribes. Also explores relevant organization and management theories, concepts and tools as applied to the management of tribal governments. Formerly a topic under PA 590. (4 units)
542. Tribal Government Gaming and Economic Development
The historical and legal foundations and practices of tribal government gaming in the United States with particular attention focused on California. Includes an analysis of tribal governance, economic development, social and economic impacts of tribal government gaming. Formerly a topic under PA 590. (4 units)
548. Management of Computers in the Public Sector
Designed to help students gain competency in computer related skills. Each topic may be taken once for credit. Three hours lecture and two hours activity laboratory.
  1. Word Processing. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
  2. Data Base Management. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
  3. Spread Sheet. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
  4. Communication. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
  5. Networking (4 units)
  6. Special Problems. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
  7. Geographic Information Systems (4 units)
557. Public Sector Labor Relations
Analyzes issues created by collective bargaining and unionism in public sectors. Examples: selection of bargaining agents, bargaining scope and obligation, impasse resolution and grievance procedure. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
564. Local Public Administration
Administrative characteristics and problems of public management in the urban area, including city, county, school and special district organization and functions. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
568. Accounting for Government and Not-for-Profit Organizations
Covers principles and practices of government fund accounting. Topics include governmental accounting concepts, types and structure of funds and accounts, application of generally accepted accounting principles to government and not-for-profit entities, presentation and uses of financial statements. (Also offered as ACCT 468. Students may not receive credit for both.) Prerequisite: ACCT 211 and the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
575. Internship in Public Administration
Supervised work and study in private or public organizations. May be repeated once for credit. A total of two College of Business and Public Administration 575 courses may be applied toward graduation. Graded credit/no credit. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and the department's internship coordinator. (4 units)
590. Seminar in Public Administration
An intensive study of some phase of public administration to be developed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (4 units)
595. Independent Study
Special topics involving library and/or field research. A total of 10 units in any College of Business and Public Administration 595 may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0, consent of instructor and approval by the department of a written project/proposal submitted to the appropriate department in the College of Business and Public Administration on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken. (2 or 4 units)

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (SCM)

Lower Division

210. Applied Business Statistics
An introduction to statistical reasoning and application of primary statistical techniques used in solving managerial problems. Covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Students may not receive credit for more than one of the following courses: PSYC 210 or SCM 210. Formerly MSCI 210. Three hours lecture and two hours activity laboratory. (4 units)

Upper Division

304. Principles of Supply Chain Management
Introduction to supply chain management concepts and techniques. Methods that aid the manager in making rational decisions in manufacturing and service industries are discussed. Emphasis is on the application of models to managerial decision making. Formerly MSCI 304 and OM 304. Prerequisites: MATH 110 or 120 and SCM 210. (4 units)
305. Enterprise Resource Planning
Foundation for enterprise resource planning and implementation, including supply chain and transportation management modeling and operations planning. Configuration and application of an enterprise system. Formerly SCM 205. (Also offered as IST 305. Students may not receive credit for both.) Prerequisite: SCM 304 or consent of instructor. (4 units)
350. Decision Making in Supply Chain and Transportation Management
Decision making process used by supply chain and transportation managers. Different perspectives of individual and organizational decision making, and analysis and interpretation of data to make effective decisions. Prerequisite: SCM 304. (4 units)
405. Advanced Enterprise Systems
Advanced study of enterprise systems planning in different stages of organizational operations. Students use enterprise planning technology to examine cases in different organizational settings. (Also offered as IST 405. Students may not receive credit for both.) Prerequisites: SCM 304 and 305. (4 units)
440. Transportation Systems Management
Analysis of alternative transportation modes, carriers, services, rates and policies as related to overall operation of an organization's shipping and/or traffic departments. Formerly MKTG 452. Prerequisite: SCM 304. (4 units)
445. International Logistics
Logistics management involving goods and services in different countries. International business environment, international transportation, intermediaries, import/export regulations, payment and risks, and cultural differences of the global supply chain. Prerequisite: SCM 304. (4 units)
466. Operations Planning and Control
Analytical approach to traditional and modern concepts in operations analysis and planning. Includes application of techniques to accomplish the organization's mission by using productive resources. Formerly OM 466. Prerequisite: SCM 304. (4 units)
470. Supply Chain Management
Comprehensive study of all activities and processes to supply products or services to final customers. Topics include: purchasing, logistics and supply chain optimization, inventory control, warehouse and distribution management. Formerly OM 470. Prerequisite: SCM 304. (4 units)
480. Quality Management
Description and analysis of quality assurance programs and techniques and their many applications in supply chain and transportation from a total quality management perspective. Topics include quality planning, statistical quality control, quality design and measurement, and management of six sigma quality and inspection. Formerly OM 480. Prerequisite: SCM 304. (4 units)
490. Strategic Management in Supply Chain and Transportation
Development, implementation and integration of strategies in supply chain and transportation management. Capstone course for the fields of supply chain and transportation management. Includes case studies and use of current technology. Prerequisites: the upper-division writing requirement and completion of all other courses in concentration program or consent of instructor. (4 units)
575. Internship in Supply Chain Management
Supervised work and study in private or public organizations. May be repeated once for credit. A total of two College of Business and Public Administration 575 courses may be applied toward graduation. Graded credit/no credit. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and the department's internship coordinator. (4 units)
590. Seminar in Supply Chain Management
An intensive study of some phase of supply chain management to be developed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Formerly MSCI 590. Prerequisite: the upper-division writing requirement. (4 units)
595. Independent Study
Special topics involving library and/or field research. A total of 10 units in any College of Business and Public Administration 595 may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0, the upper-division writing requirement, consent of instructor and approval by the department of a written project/proposal submitted to the appropriate department in the College of Business and Public Administration on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken. Formerly MSCI 595. (2 or 4 units)

Graduate level courses can be found on Page 422 of the 2012-2014 Bulletin of Courses.

For more information please visit our website. College of Business & Public Administration